Challenge EMR Vendors to “Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is”

Change has arrived. The government, through the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), will provide an incentive if you purchase and meaningfully use a “government” EMR. The problem is that the HHS incentive will only pay for the type of systems that have a dismal track record with busy, high-volume physicians.

Landmark studies have demonstrated that government EMRs, (traditional, CCHIT-style EMRs), impose financial hardship on physicians. There does not exist a single landmark study that concludes otherwise. Just ask any government EMR vendor to prove otherwise with any landmark study that meets the “smell test”:

  • The study is either large in scale or by a venerable, nationally recognized institution.
  • The study is not vendor funded.
  • The study must specifically address physician productivity. Studies that claim benefits of EMR accruing to other industry stakeholders are not relevant.

Before embarking on an expensive and risky venture into the world of government EMRs, you owe it to yourself to be 100% sure that the system is usable and adoptable for your unique practice. If you are not able to prove to CMS that you are a “meaningful user” of the EMR technology, the entire cost of an expensive EMR purchase will rest on your shoulders.

How do you make sure that your investment in a government EMR will perform just as the sales rep promises and bring your practice into the digital world, while receiving payments from the government? Easy. Insist that the vendor puts its money where its mouth is.

Before investing heavily in a government EMR, know ahead of time whether or not you will be successful. Have the vendor prove to you that they can get 2 physicians in your practice live on their system. To be fair, no money should exchange hands—only time. The two physicians and their staff will invest their valuable time learning the system and the vendor will invest its valuable time implementing and training. If, after a 30-day trial period, you are happy and can see that practice-wide implementation of the government EMR is feasible, then you sign a contract with the confidence that the investment is worthwhile. If you feel that the government EMR is not right for you, then the government EMR vendor removes the system from your office and a financial disaster is averted.

The power of this arrangement is that the government EMR vendor, whose sales rep promises the world, actually has to back up its claims with a fair trial by you, the “real-world user.” If the product does not perform as you expect, then you will not suffer the loss of a substantial investment. Go ahead and make the government EMR vendor “put its money where its mouth is.”