RFP: Relevant For Productivity?

Identifying the right EHR for a practice has always been difficult—there are so many choices; there is no objective information about competing products; you have to rely on vendor-identified references; and there is an abundance of misinformation about what is (or is not) required by the government. To sort out this information, consultants and practices often rely on the well-known acronym RFP—Request for Proposal—even though the RFP process is flawed.

The big problem with RFPs is that they emphasize the wrong criteria. They yield information about product features and functionality, but not usability and impact on productivity. It’s like buying a car with a full set of luxury options, only to realize later that it tops out at 40 miles per hour. What you didn’t consider is “usability.” EHR failure is tied directly to the impact on physician productivity, yet not one of the last 10 RFPs I’ve received—each containing 100–200 questions—has even mentioned productivity. In fact, by their very nature, RFPs cannot evaluate the characteristics most critical to successful adoption because there is no way to objectively measure things like productivity, efficiency, and usability in a written format. This is why practices using RFPs still end up as part of the 50% EHR-adoption failure statistics.

RFPs provide detailed information about product features and functionality; however, here’s what you can’t learn from even the most comprehensive RFP:

  • How long it takes a physician to use the features to accomplish routine clinical tasks—for example, write a prescription, review a chart, or send a message.
  • What the net effect on productivity will be—during implementation phase and ongoing.
  • What the likelihood is of receiving government incentives—i.e., your ability to use the EHR as required.
  • How great the failure rate/number of dissatisfied clients is—from de-installations to clients no longer using the software—particularly in your specialty and practice size.
  • What percentage of customers is not using the EHR fully—e.g., still dictating exam notes and transcribing.

To obtain this critical information, practices must take control of the competitive analysis process. Do your own benchmarking of the number of clicks and time required to accomplish a few simple tasks with each of the EHRs under consideration. To estimate the value of the impact on productivity, input the time difference per exam into the productivity calculator. The insights gathered regarding the comparative merits of EHR products will be infinitely more valuable than the information received in response to a 20-page RFP.

Instead of relying solely on an RFP, use a stopwatch to evaluate and compare EHRs. If you would like a stopwatch, just e-mail your name and address to stopwatch@srssoft.com and I will send you a complimentary one.

2 thoughts on “RFP: Relevant For Productivity?

  1. Paul,

    The type of EMR I would recommend depends on your goals (e.g., office efficiency, government stimulus money, chart documentation, coding assistance, managing transcription expenses, etc.). Also, EMR offerings have wide variations of success depending on specialty, patient volume and revenue generated per unit of time spent in the exam room. Please let me know what your goals are, your specialty and the calculated “Revenue gained / lost per year (value of 2 minutes / exam)” by clicking on this link http://www.srssoft.com/assets/files/What-is-the-Value-of-Your-Time.xls.

    Evan

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