EMR Selection: How to Uncover the Truth

Why are a growing number of practices considering replacing their EMR, or even de-installing it altogether? Most likely because they made their purchase based on a checklist of features and a slick demo, rather than on a careful analysis of actual usability. Physicians who are trading in their EMRs have realized that the features that seemed so attractive at the outset are meaningless when physicians don’t use them.

There are two kinds of features: The first are the glitzy bells and whistles that, while impressive in a sales presentation, are too time-consuming and difficult for physicians to use on a regular basis in the course of seeing patients. Such features are the result of sales-driven—rather than physician-focused—software development efforts. These are the features that one can easily check off in a Request for Proposal (RFP), the limitations of which I discussed in another EMR Straight Talk post. The more important features—those that create usability, e.g., speed, ergonomics, a unified desktop, etc.—are much harder to assess without actually using the EMR in a practice environment. Other than by trial, you can only evaluate usability by speaking with actual users, which makes it absolutely critical to make the best use of EMR references. The following are my top ten suggestions for maximizing the value of client references:

1. Take command of the process yourself—do not let the vendor control which practices you visit and with whom you speak.

2. Ask the vendor for—and insist on—more than just a few references to practices in your specialty, along with a significant sample of practices that are a similar size to yours. (In EMR References: Cast a Wider Net, I suggested asking for fifteen.) Unless your practice is located in a very remote area, you should not have to travel a great distance to find a reference site. Be leery of large, national EMR companies that only offer a limited number of references in relation to the number of clients they claim to have.

3. Identify some references on your own by networking with colleagues in your area, at your hospital(s), through professional organizations, or on listservs. Contact these practices directly. You will enhance your chances of getting balanced information if your sources are not limited to the vendor’s hand-picked, successful clients.

4. Involve both administrators and physicians in the site visits. Physicians must get first-hand feedback from other physicians to determine how—and if—the system could be used effectively in their own practice.

5. Make sure your physicians observe the client’s physicians using the EMR. They should speak with more than one physician at the practice to make certain that all, not just one, of the physicians are successfully using the system. Conversations with randomly selected physicians are most likely to yield reliable feedback.

6. Investigate the impact on physician productivity by asking physicians how many patients they saw per day before implementation, how much they had to cut their schedule back during implementation, and how many patients they see currently.

7. Be concerned if the vendor’s representative insists on being involved in every conversation with the reference. People are hesitant to make negative comments in the presence of the vendor for fear of repercussions.

8. Ask questions such as: “What EMR features did you expect to use that you are not using, and why not?” or “How do you document patient visits?” to elicit valuable information.

9. Ask the practice manager and/or physicians if you can call them again if any other questions come to mind. Get e-mail addresses and follow up as needed.

10. Devote a significant amount of time to the process.

Controlling the reference process will increase your chances of a successful EMR adoption. In the absence of EMR reform protections and specialty-specific vendor satisfaction ratings, it is up to you to protect your interests by conducting thorough due diligence.