EMR Purchase: Caveat Emptor

Physicians practice evidence-based medicine. They base clinical decisions on evidence gained from scientific research and experience. As patients, this is the source of our confidence in their diagnoses and treatment plans for us. Unfortunately, an alarming number of physicians do not apply evidence-based decision-making to their EMR purchases. This explains the 50–80% EMR failure rate documented in the Milbank Quarterly and cited by the AMA.

Recently, I’ve spoken with several ophthalmology practices that are struggling under the weight of unsuccessful EMR implementations—many of these situations would have been averted by asking the right people the right questions at the right time—before signing the EMR contract. Let me share a few examples of how aggressive due diligence uncovers important facts:

Buyer BewareAn ophthalmology practice purchased an EMR from [Vendor 1] based on its ad stating that nearly 500 ophthalmology practices use a [Vendor 1] product. Had the physicians asked for the names of 10 ophthalmology practices of their size that use this vendor’s EMR, they would have learned—by the lack of response—that most of the 500 practices use the vendor’s practice-management system, not its EMR. Don’t fall prey to deceptive marketing.

Beware of references with vested interests. For example, a physician would never know that the reference for [Vendor 2] has an ownership interest in the vendor’s company. Not surprisingly, the reference physician described the EMR as “excellent.” It was only a subsequent blog comment from another physician in the practice that revealed that, after 3 years, she still schedules 6 fewer patients each day and has hired a skilled technician to assist her, adding $37,500 per year in costs.

Another practice made a visit to [Vendor 3’s] reference site and learned that the physicians in the practice are, in fact, using the EMR. If they had probed further and asked about staffing, however, they would have learned that instead of 8 scribes, this practice now employs 24 scribes to handle the necessary data entry—two for each ophthalmologist (instead of one before the EMR adoption), and one for each optometrist (when the optometrists had never needed any scribes at all before the EMR).

It’s equally important to randomly select physicians to call. Do not limit your conversations to those physicians hand-picked by the vendor—other physicians in the practice will always take calls from colleagues. Ask each physician how many patients he or she sees each day now as opposed to before EMR implementation. Within the same practice that purchased [Vendor 4’s] EMR, physicians using the EMR successfully are those who see only 25 patients per day, while the ones who see 60 patients daily do not use it because of its effect on their productivity.

If you apply the same due diligence and evidence-based decision-making to your EMR search that you do to treating your patients, you will have the information you need to ensure that the EMR you select will be the right EMR for your practice.

2 thoughts on “EMR Purchase: Caveat Emptor

  1. Excellent and clear explanation why asking questions and probing under the surface is the only way to get to the truth not just in Medicine but in all aspects of life.

  2. Physicians should know that there is currently not one vendor out there that has an EHR product that has been certified by the ONC (which meets the meaningful use requirements of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid). So until they are ‘certified’ do not waste your money on investing in the software. The ONC will provide a listing of EHR vendors whose products have been certified in late 2010 or early 2011.

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