Physicians: Don’t Count on EHR Support from Hospitals

Anthony Guerra, noted HIT industry blogger and editor of HealthSystemCIO, has written extensively about the pressures and stresses facing hospital Chief Information Officers (CIOs) due to the myriad government programs making demands on their skills and their time. His recent survey revealed that a mere 16% of CIOs manage to maintain a relatively normal workweek of 40–49 hours, while 35% report working over 60 hours per week. In my opinion, the current level of stress extends throughout all levels of the IT staff—a sentiment echoed at today’s HIT Policy Committee meeting as they evaluated the recommendations for Stage 2 meaningful use.

This is not surprising. In the midst of upgrading to meet meaningful use requirements—a bigger challenge for many hospitals than originally anticipated—IT departments are expected to simultaneously prepare their facilities to comply with the impending 5010 requirements and convert their systems from ICD-9 to ICD-10. Also looming in the not-too-distant future are the newly defined Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), which will require significant and expanded data and reporting capabilities. All of this is compounded by a shortage of IT professionals in the healthcare arena.

So how does this relate to private-practice physicians—the constituency on whom I typically focus? I’ve cautioned in a previous post, One Size Does Not Fit All, about the mismatch between the EHR needs of hospitals and of physicians in private practice. Physicians should also be wary of adopting their hospital’s EHR if they are doing so with the expectation that the hospital’s IT resources will be at their disposal. They will be sadly disappointed—supporting private practice physicians, particularly specialists, will be low on the list of priorities for IT staff when their plates are already overflowing.