Rome Wasn’t Built in a Day

In my last EMR Straight Talk post (Stage 2 Clinical Quality Measures—More Is Not Better), I maintained that simply adding a large number of new quality measures without addressing the underlying flaws in the reporting process will do little to advance the program towards its goals. So I was very interested in reading Joseph Goedert’s blog the following week in Health Data Management: “Why Must CMS Overreach on Rules?”

In discussing the proposed rule regarding Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), Joe makes a similar argument to mine. He questions CMS’s proposal that, to share in an ACO’s savings, providers would have to report on 65 quality measures—including 28 new measures—when CMS will not even be ready in 2012 to electronically accept the considerably smaller number of quality measures associated with meaningful use.

In both cases, CMS is trying desperately to accomplish a long-term vision, albeit a noble one, in too short a timeframe. While formulating its proposal for Stage 2 meaningful use, the HIT Policy Committee had several intense discussions about the trade-off between (1) aggressively moving toward the end goal and losing people along the way because they were overwhelmed and feared failure, and (2) accepting a slower pace, but with a greater chance of success. The foundation of the programs have to be solid, or real progress will not be achieved.

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Reader’s Correction/Clarification:

In my EMR Straight Talk post on August 10, (“HIE’s and Information Sharing—Physicians Feel the Pressure”), I incorrectly stated that without membership in NYU’s UPN (University Physicians Network), “physicians do not have access to the group’s favorably negotiated reimbursement rates.” I received a comment from Robert Goff, Executive Director of NYU’s UPN, stating that “UPN does not negotiate with any payer or health plan outside of fully compliant shared risk arrangements,” and that the requirement regarding physician information technology “is part of a broad initiative to promote enhanced quality and the delivery of more efficient health care.”

I apologize for the misstatement.