The Case for Centralized Quality Reporting: A Perfect Example

The Case for Centralized Quality Reporting: A Perfect Example’ TimeQuality measure reporting is one of the 3 basic tenets of the EHR Incentive Program—the other 2 being ePrescribing and data sharing (interoperability)—as identified in ARRA, the program’s defining legislation. It is a key component to improving the quality of patient care. In a recent EMR Straight Talk post—“A Waste of Physicians’ Money and Vendors’ Time”—I proposed a more cost-effective method of analyzing clinical quality measure (CQM) data that would deliver more useful information for quality improvement than the approach currently in place for meaningful use. I suggested that rather than requiring each of the 472 vendors of certified EHRs to program the same CQMs (no longer 125 as initially proposed, but still a burdensome 64), EHRs should simply collect and report the data, and CMS or its designate should provide the analytics. Such a centralized approach would not only be more efficient, but it would produce more consistent and reliable data. Most importantly, it would allow for the immediate implementation of any changes to measure specifications as necessitated by the availability of new medical information.

Recently, I confronted a perfect example of the ineffectiveness of the current system and the opportunities that a centralized approach would afford. A physician informed me that a new CVX (immunization) code was created for the influenza vaccine—CVX code 144. While I told this client that we could easily add this code to the EHR for his use in documenting vaccinations (which we did), these vaccinations would unfortunately still not be reflected in the numerator for NQF 0041 (Preventive Care and Screening: Influenza Immunization for Patients over Age 50)—a fact validated by CMS. New electronic specifications for CQMs will not be implemented until 2014, and the current specifications remain in force for 2012 and 2013.

As an EHR vendor, I certainly appreciate the fact that we are not subject to the expectation that we will reprogram measures off-cycle. That would wreak havoc with our development roadmap and resource planning. Furthermore, changing the calculations to accommodate the new codes would compromise data comparability. So now we have comparable—but incorrect—data that does not reflect actual vaccination status. Under this system, how will we ever stay current as medicine constantly evolves?

Just imagine if everyone could begin using the new CVX codes immediately because the electronic specifications were updated in one centralized location with one effort. This is just one example from a potential 64 CQMs. How much more value would we derive from all the work that we demand of physicians in capturing the CQM data? How can we accelerate healthcare improvement if we are always 2–3 years behind?

One Response to “The Case for Centralized Quality Reporting: A Perfect Example”

  1. I think you are trying to polish a turd. The Wall Street Journal had a great article this week on why Electric Health records are not working and not near to the point when the reality meets the promise.

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