Dreams vs. Reality

“I want to be a doctor when I grow up.”superman

What did you want to be when you were growing up? I wonder how many of today’s physicians, knowing what they know now, wish they could turn back time and change that childhood ambition. That calling. That innate drive to help people. Because after devoting countless grueling hours to schooling, internships, and residencies… after earning a reputation based on providing personalized care, one patient at a time… after building a business based on an immeasurable combination of talent and knowledge, suddenly the field of medicine is being commoditized. No wonder physician burnout is on the rise—up 16% in two years, according to this Medscape Physician Lifestyle Report.

The government is telling doctors that an EHR can absorb mass data and spit out the right answer better than they can. Doctors are paying more to run their practices, earning less, and are still expected to provide quality care for record numbers of patients. And those patients have no idea what is going on behind the scenes, so their satisfaction levels are at risk. As physicians aim to fulfill their Hippocratic Oath in this world where they also are required to mitigate their own legal risks, direct their attention away from humans and toward technologies, and follow data directives based on masses instead of their own professional insights, the people on both sides of the examination table are feeling it.

In a recent survey, PhysiciansPractice.com published a list of things physicians wish patients knew. Here are some of the findings:

• “I wish they knew why physicians usually run late.”

• “I wish they knew that I do care about the pain they are having… even if I seem busy or preoccupied.”

• “I wish they knew how often we have to fight with their insurance companies just to get paid for services we’ve rendered.”

When it comes to practicing medicine, there are no limits to the differences that can exist between cases—and allowing physicians to discern those nuances is critical to providing the best patient care. Rather than getting caught up in the negativity surrounding these ongoing changes, I’d like to ask these professionals for whom I have tremendous admiration to weigh in.

Doctors: What changes would make practicing medicine more in line with the reasons you chose to become a physician?

Scott Ciccarelli

Scott Ciccarelli

CEO at SRS Health
Scott Ciccarelli, Chief Executive Officer at SRS, has more than 20 years of diverse management and operations experience garnered as a senior executive at GE, where he headed two of the company’s businesses—most recently, GE Healthcare’s Services, Ambulatory and Revenue Cycle Solutions. His areas of expertise include business strategy, leadership development, operational rigor (Lean Six Sigma), and the delivery of enhanced value for customers through quality improvement and innovation.
Scott Ciccarelli

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