Can Innovation Be the Cure?

clock-blogTechnology has revolutionized almost everything. From the way we consume music to how we engage in commerce, the entire experience has been dramatically transformed to make our lives better, more efficient, and in some instances to provide us with services that we could only have imagined just a few years ago. Consider how we currently use GPS in our cars versus how we navigated to our destinations just a decade or so ago. However, Healthcare Information Technology (HIT), and EHR in particular, has been one of the few industries that has not taken full advantage of the digital revolution.

Despite this, I believe that all is not lost. Although EHR solutions remain highly inefficient, I am convinced that many real, practical problems that couldn’t otherwise be solved in the analog world—such as identification of drug interactions, clinical-decision support, and machine learning to identify result-driven workflows—are now ripe to be addressed by digital technology.

Why now? The answer might surprise you—it can, at least partially, be credited to the meaningful use regulations. Don’t get me wrong, the negative unintended consequences of the MU programs have been well documented, from the inefficiencies and overhead burdens it has created for healthcare professionals, to the consolidation of the EHR industry, to the commoditization of EHR. There are plenty of cons to go around, but there are pros that, if leveraged properly, could form the foundation that the industry needs to achieve the ultimate goal of better outcomes and reasonable costs for everyone. What are some of these advantages? Patient charts are finally in some type of digital format, information sharing is beginning to be a reality, and interoperability among various systems is not just a buzzword that you read in articles and blog posts and hear at conferences—vendors are now allocating big dollars towards achieving it.

Make no mistake: healthcare professionals will always be at the center of the decision tree when it comes to how you and I are treated for medical issues, but leveraging advancements in computer science such as artificial intelligence (AI) and predictive algorithms can support more informed decision making. With AI, the abundance of data, and the right tools to analyze it, workflows can be better adapted to each professional’s specialty and needs, patients can engage in their healthcare, and treatment plans can be better optimized.

Today, many healthcare professionals hate their EHRs, and over 40% say that “EHRs interfere with the doctor-patient relationship.” It’s time we take on this issue. If providers, vendors, and patients join forces, we might be able to unleash the next generation of solutions and supercharge the healthcare digital revolution. I believe innovation is the just the cure we’ve been searching for!

What innovators are you looking for? What HIT innovation would you like to see?

Khal Rai

Khal Rai

Senior Vice President, Development at SRS Health
Khal oversees the Software Engineering, Business Analysis, Quality Assurance, and Product Management teams at SRS. His 17+ years’ experience in software development and healthcare IT have resulted in a true passion for collaborating with customers, then translating their needs into innovative solutions and better service experiences. He believes that motivated employees and satisfied customers are keys to maintaining business success. He has a B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University.
Khal Rai

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About Khal Rai

Khal oversees the Software Engineering, Business Analysis, Quality Assurance, and Product Management teams at SRS. His 17+ years’ experience in software development and healthcare IT have resulted in a true passion for collaborating with customers, then translating their needs into innovative solutions and better service experiences. He believes that motivated employees and satisfied customers are keys to maintaining business success. He has a B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University.