Patient-centric Data Capture—Where Is It?

hc-prof-blog-image-v2We all know how increasingly important the patient experience is becoming in clinical trials and healthcare. With more emphasis being placed on quality care and patients’ active participation in their own treatment, it follows that this will have an effect on what solutions and services are required to satisfy consumers in this market. Consumers nowadays have a flood of information available at their fingertips—an amount unimaginable even just 15 years ago. And while the ability to look up symptoms online in the middle of the night has undoubtedly increased the number of hypochondriacs, it has also led to a higher number of truly educated patients, and an accompanying need for specialists to respect and involve them in the diagnosis and treatment process.

But what does it mean to be patient-centric? Our good friend Wikipedia defines it as “support[ing] active involvement of patients and their families in the design of new care models and in decision-making about individual options for treatment.” Not much help, is it really?

The Institute of Medicine defines it as “providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values, and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions.” The difference in definitions seems to come down to how involved the patient gets in their healthcare. The first definition suggests that the specialist is at the center of decision making, but supports the patient involvement as well. The latter, at least in my opinion, implies that the specialist actively collaborates with the patient by empowering them with the necessary data to make their own treatment decisions.

By either definition, however, data capture is currently falling short of what it takes to be truly patient-centric, despite how far it has come over the last decade. Electronic Health Record (EHR) solutions have been widely adopted in a variety of healthcare specializations, and although the way they collect data can create friction and inefficiencies with specialists’ workflow, they still provide enormous benefits. They streamline access for the specialists to vast quantities of patient data more quickly than traditional paper-based systems, and they eliminate need for patients to fill out the same forms again and again at each specialist’s office.

With the power of technology growing at an exponential rate, new technology solutions are coming out every day, but the challenge is to figure out how to use these technologies to address the real problems that medical practices are facing. In other words, to provide the right technology solution, one that really works for practices. At the moment, more often than not, EHR software interferes with and takes time away from the doctor-patient interaction. However, by giving specialists data-capture tools that allow them to focus on their traditional role of caregivers and that reduce the time and energy that is diverted away from patients, everyone benefits: specialists win, and therefore so do their patients.

There are already good vendors out there who are designing solutions with specialists’ requirements in mind, and some of these certainly help to give specialists more time with patients. However, to achieve a truly patient-centric solution, data capture will need to both predict and adapt to the data being fed into it in real-time. This would give specialists relevant, up-to-date information right at their fingertips, which they could use both to inform their own decision-making process and to educate the patient on their particular condition. The result would be a collaborative, evidence-based plan of care that—because the patient had participated in creating it—would lead to an increased patient commitment to the plan and a better outcome overall.

That’s what providing a truly patient-centric solution looks like.

To find out more about the evolution of data capture and what to expect in the future, you can read our recent white paper on this topic.

Adam Curran

Adam Curran

Product Marketing Manager at SRS Health
Adam Curran is a Product Marketing Manager at SRS. He oversees marketing intelligence to support the development of strategic marketing plans. Prior to joining the organization, he was a key member of a pharmaceutical software company’s Clinical Development Business Unit, specializing in the clinical data management elements of the drug development lifecycle. He was also the editor for their microsite’s blog. Adam has also held roles at the UK’s National Energy Foundation and Skills Funding Agency.
Adam Curran
This entry was posted in EHR, EMR, Healthcare, Innovation, Technology by Adam Curran. Bookmark the permalink.

About Adam Curran

Adam Curran is a Product Marketing Manager at SRS. He oversees marketing intelligence to support the development of strategic marketing plans. Prior to joining the organization, he was a key member of a pharmaceutical software company’s Clinical Development Business Unit, specializing in the clinical data management elements of the drug development lifecycle. He was also the editor for their microsite’s blog. Adam has also held roles at the UK’s National Energy Foundation and Skills Funding Agency.