Free-Flow Workflow: How Did This Help with Data Collection?

data-flow“Being flooded with information doesn’t mean we have the right information or that we’re in touch with the right people” – Bill Gates

We are able to collect a wealth of information today, thanks to technological improvements over the last couple of years. For a long time, specialists struggled to get the most out of earlier EHR solutions due to the limited data available. This was not so much the fault of EHR vendors but rather of the inherent limitations of the technology at the time. Additionally, the first “templated” EHR systems were specifically designed for primary care and family practice doctors. These systems were not suitable to meet specialists’ different data needs and handle a much higher volume. I did a post recently on the evolution of data capture (read it here).

When it comes to submitting meaningful use data to CMS, however, with all this data available, identifying and collecting it generally takes a long time. There are studies that show an increase in the number of physicians who spend more than one day a week on paperwork, and that indicate many physicians still feel that EHRs do not save time. Although this technology is allowing practices to comply with meaningful use requirements, the cost seems to be too high.

What are we seeing here? Physicians are spending more time capturing data due to regulations, and this is taking up the time available to see patients. How did we get to a point where the physician is spending more time staring at the screen than looking at the patient? I’m not a doctor, but I can imagine that they went into the profession to actually help people as much as they can, so more face-to-face time with the patient is the end goal here.

What is the solution to handling this volume of data? Certainly not reducing the amount of data—it would be hard and time-consuming to distinguish which data to get rid of. The solution must focus on making it quicker to handle this data. This is where free-flow workflow comes into play. Rather than having to go through the laborious process of submitting the data to each application, it essentially reduced the repetitive steps involved, thereby streamlining the submission of data.

This big time saver helps to alleviate the pain, but there are still limitations. Fortunately, we are now at a point where we can get a workflow that isn’t just free-flow, but also adaptive. To find out more about this development and other future trends, you can read our white paper.

Adam Curran

Adam Curran

Product Marketing Manager at SRS Health
Adam Curran is a Product Marketing Manager at SRS. He oversees marketing intelligence to support the development of strategic marketing plans. Prior to joining the organization, he was a key member of a pharmaceutical software company’s Clinical Development Business Unit, specializing in the clinical data management elements of the drug development lifecycle. He was also the editor for their microsite’s blog. Adam has also held roles at the UK’s National Energy Foundation and Skills Funding Agency.
Adam Curran
This entry was posted in EHR, Government, Healthcare, Physicians, Technology by Adam Curran. Bookmark the permalink.

About Adam Curran

Adam Curran is a Product Marketing Manager at SRS. He oversees marketing intelligence to support the development of strategic marketing plans. Prior to joining the organization, he was a key member of a pharmaceutical software company’s Clinical Development Business Unit, specializing in the clinical data management elements of the drug development lifecycle. He was also the editor for their microsite’s blog. Adam has also held roles at the UK’s National Energy Foundation and Skills Funding Agency.