You Say You Want a Revolution…

This past February, SRS Health sponsored its third annual hackathon. Hackathons are the proving grounds for new ideas. These events stimulate creativity and encourage risk-taking to develop innovative solutions to new or persistent problems.Hackathon Blog ImageThis year’s hackathon was organized around the theme of Data Revolution, and when you think about it, there’s a revolutionary quality to the very idea of hackathons. The word “hackathon” is a portmanteau of the words “hack” and “marathon,” where “hack” is used in the sense of exploratory programming. It’s this exploratory aspect of hackathons that enables participants to be super creative, push boundaries, think outside-of-the-box and develop revolutionary ideas. We solicit ideas from customers and SRSers that can range from practical enhancements to futuristic solutions for tomorrow’s problems.

At SRS Health, we’ve noticed some strong benefits to running hackathons:

  • Feedback – If our product is going to help solve your problems, we need to know what those problems are. Hackathons allow us to discover problems and explore solutions.
  • Engagement – Hackathons build team and community spirit. Participants have fun, and they get a chance to collaborate with others with whom they don’t typically work with on a daily basis.
  • Diversity – Having a wide range of participants generates a variety of fresh perspectives, both on existing problems and for future possibilities.

The result? An event filled with fun, high-energy, free food, great ideas, engaging presentations and amazingly talented people. There are a number of concepts that we are very excited about and could make its way into future editions of our products.

So, if you have a revolutionary idea that you’d like to see become part of our product—or even just an evolutionary step that fixes a chronic problem—let us know about it. It may be the perfect candidate for our next hackathon. The truth is, we all want to change the world of healthcare, and we’d love to explore and define that future together with you!

 

 

 

The Importance of Flexible Technology in High-Performance Practices

flexible-tech-blogAn article posted recently to LinkedIn—about the jobs most and least likely to fall victim to robot replacements—started me thinking about the place of technology in healthcare. One takeaway from the article is that automation is best deployed for tasks that are manually or cognitively repetitive, freeing humans to specialize in tasks that are non-repetitive and non-predictable, ones the writer describes as requiring “human intuition, reasoning, empathy and emotion.”[1]

That was exactly the promise of electronic health record (EHR) technology—routine bureaucratic tasks would be automated, freeing doctors and staff to do what they do best: treat patients. Yet in a recent study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, ambulatory physicians spent an average of a full hour at the computer for every hour they spent face to face with patients.[2] Imagine automating a factory and discovering that workers now worked twice as long, or produced half as much, because of the time required by the new technology that was supposed to reduce their workload.

Paradoxically, with recent advances in technology, it is now more possible than ever for EHRs to fulfill their original promise—and more; the problem is that most of the EHRs being offered to medical practices are simply the wrong technology. In an attempt to meet standardized government regulations, vendors have created standardized EHRs—gigantic, one-size-fits-all behemoths that attempt to meet the needs of all physicians, but end up missing the mark with nearly everyone. Particularly when it comes to specialists. KLAS’ Ambulatory Specialty 2016—One Size Does Not Fit All—Performance Report found that although traditional EHR vendors try to cover all specialties, fields like ophthalmology, orthopedics, and dermatology still lack the functionality required.[3]

This is why one size definitely does not fit all. The right EHR solution for a hospital or general practitioner, seeing a limited number of patents with a wide variety of conditions, will look quite different from the EHR for specialists who see a high volume of patents with similar complaints. And of course, different specialties won’t want exactly the same EHR, either, making flexibility—rather than universal applicability—a major prerequisite.

No wonder that 86% of specialists, according to Black Book Market Research, agree that the single biggest trend in technology replacements these days is the move to specialty-driven EHRs because of the workflow and productivity complications that accompany conventional, template-driven EHRs.[4]

Unfortunately, the problems with inflexible, template-driven EHRs don’t end with the lack of specialty-specific solutions. A secondary, but still significant, concern is the inability of many EHRs to be tailored to the need of individual physicians within the practice. One doctor may prefer taking notes, another inputs her own data, while a third dictates; one may be comfortable communicating through a patent portal, another prefers the phone. True flexibility means that no provider has to change the way that he or she has been practicing medicine simply to satisfy the demands of a generic template.

It also means that, when it comes to increasingly crucial matter of data collection, the decision about how data should be collected—what should be collected electronically and which should remain manual—is left up to the individual practice. In the next blog, I will look at what is called “role-based data entry,” and how this can increase productivity and cut costs.


 

[1] https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/5-jobs-robots-take-first-shelly-palmer

[2] http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2546704

[3] Ambulatory Specialty 2016—One Size Does Not Fit All—Performance Report. KLAS. April 2016.

[4] https://blackbookmarketresearch.newswire.com/news/specialty-driven-ehrs-make-a-comeback-reveals-2016-black-book-11534546

Hot Topics for Orthopaedics

SRS Health attends the annual OrthoForums and AAOS meetings as a way of remaining in sync with the topics that are top of mind for our clients. As an HCIT solutions partner, we are continually striving to provide our clients with relevant solutions, training, and advice on resources so that they can meet challenges head on while remaining productive and focused on the practice of medicine. The forums and academy meetings provide us with additional insight outside of our day-to-day interactions, and often serve as springboards for our collaborative efforts.

This year, the prominent topics in the orthopaedic community include:

  • prescription safety
  • data mining/outcomes;
  • cost reduction/operational efficiencies; and
  • MACRA/ MIPs readiness.

Prescription safety has gained increased focus as numerous studies and reports focus on the increased use and abuse of opioids. As a result, individual states are beginning to enact laws addressing the prescribing of controlled substances. Electronic prescribing of controlled substances (EPCS) is currently legal in all 50 states. New York State was the first to pass mandatory I-Stop legislation requiring ePrescribing of all drugs, with stringent identity authentication requirements for controlled substances as of March 27, 2016. Maine has followed suit with the Act to Prevent Opiate Abuse by Strengthening the Controlled Substances Prescription Monitoring Program, requiring prescriber participation in the Prescription Monitoring Program and setting limits for the strength and duration of opioid prescriptions, beginning January 2017. The law also called for prescribers to undergo addiction training every two years. On February 23, 2017, New Jersey issued a bulletin regarding State Opioid Prescribing Information, alerting prescribers to components of a law governing opioid prescribing that takes effect in May. Minnesota also has a similar CDS law on its books, although not as strictly enforced. The expectation is that stringent monitoring will only become more prevalent, with mandatory requirements that will include patient education. As a result, many providers have voluntarily adopted EPCS practices, and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has created a multimedia public service campaign, including display and radio ads, urging physicians and patients to exercise caution in prescribing and taking opioids.Painkillers Campaign Image2

As we embrace the value-based payment model, data mining and patient-reported outcomes are top of mind. The critical piece to the puzzle is the ability to collect and report on pertinent and meaningful data to demonstrate improved outcomes. Many physicians are currently considering the selection of an outcomes solution to integrate within their existing HCIT ecosystem. There is no firm consensus across the orthopaedic space of what constitutes full outcomes data requirements, and many are focused on choosing an optimal solution that delivers minimal PRO requirements—i.e., HOOS (Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores) and KOOS (Knee injury & Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores)—at the right price point.

As the payment model shifts and practices are faced with additional reporting complexities, the ability to drive operational efficiency and reduce costs is a critical focus. Integral to all related topics—prescription safety and the ability to demonstrate outcomes, drive down operating costs and meet regulatory requirements under MACRA/MIPs—is the ability to streamline the patient intake process, satisfy the VDT, meet secure messaging requirements, and integrate patient reported data through a quality patient-portal solution. Core functional capabilities such as ease of use and access; ability to request appointments; facilitated patient communication through notifications; integration of patient information within the EHR; and the enabling of secure messaging/exchange allow orthopaedic practices to reduce the time and resources devoted to patient intake and data input, as well as to limit appointment cancellations and/or no shows. Adoption of a patient-engagement solution supports 20 points under MIPs in 2017 and up to 40 points in 2018 with the addition of patient education. The portal also becomes a critical focal point to enhancing patient care through an ongoing dialogue and supporting patient education.

MACRA/MIPs readiness and the assurance that the EHR software employed by the practice will be 2015 certified is also a topic of interest as the marketplace continues to consolidate and EHR solutions sunset. At the outset of the MU program formulated through the HITECH Act of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (also known as the 2009 Economic Stimulus Plan), there were over 500 EHR solutions vendors. Today there are fewer than 300, with continued consolidation expected as companies decide whether to further invest and develop to the 2015 certification requirements. Practices should have regular dialogue with their HCIT solutions vendors regarding their investment and plans to certify; and also the availability of MACRA/MIPs training programs to support their regulatory goals.

Your First MACRA Decision: AAPM or MIPS?

Clinicians have two options for MACRA participation—an Advanced Alternate Payment Model (AAPM) or the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS).MACRAs-2-Tracks-final

CMS has structured MACRA to encourage AAPM participation, offering clinicians a 5% lump-sum bonus on top of a share in the savings achieved by the organization. The following questions will help you determine whether you qualify for the AAPM option: 

  • Do you participate in an APM? (An ACO or other risk-based healthcare delivery program?)
  • Is your APM an AAPM? The APMs identified in the image above qualify as AAPMs by virtue of the fact that:
    • the hospital and the clinicians use certified EHR technology,
    • the organization bears both upside and downside financial risk, and
    • the providers report quality measures.

NOTE: The CMS CJR (Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement) program is now considered an AAPM. (According to the CMS Fact Sheet, this program was recently added to the list of 2017 AAPMs.)

  • Do you meet the participation volume thresholds, i.e., do you derive 25% of your Medicare revenue or see 20% of your Medicare patients through one of these channels?

If the answer to all the questions above is “Yes,” you may be a QP (qualified participant) in an AAPM. Talk to the organization’s sponsor (typically a hospital) about your participation in MACRA.

If the answer is “No,” to all, or some, of these questions, your route to MACRA success will be via MIPS, or a MIPS APM, respectively.

For more information about MIPS and MIPS APMs, see the CMS QPP website or contact me at SRS Health. I also invite you to watch (or watch again) my webinar titled, “MACRA/MIPS: The Future Starts Now.”

Outcomes: It’s What’s Inside That Counts

lightbulb-gears-blogTwo weeks ago, more than 40,000 people came together to network, share, and learn more about health data management at HIMSS17. As expected, we heard about the latest developments in top tech trends of tomorrow like artificial intelligence, data security and virtual care. One of the hottest discussion topics by this highly focused group was how to improve patient and practice health through meaningful and usable analytics. After much time listening to and participating in conversations on this critical subject matter, we are more committed than ever to helping our clients improve patient care through outcomes, and when it comes to outcomes, it’s what’s inside that counts.

What do I mean by that? This familiar phrase has been shared from generation to generation when describing what’s important about people. So how can these words of wisdom about humanity possibly apply to HCIT and outcomes for specialty medicine practices? It’s more appropriate than you might think…

In an ambulatory setting, specialist teams need the ability to analyze and make decisions within their HCIT ecosystem. They need insight within their workflow. They need to know how to deliver the best care at a lower cost. And the only way to do this in today’s data-driven world is by bringing insight and analytics inside their workflow. Not outside.

External solutions focus on providing isolated results rather than a holistic approach to patient and practice health. What’s an outside solution? It’s anything that requires you to offload data, thereby taking you out of the ecosphere. If that data is not contained in the ecosphere – if the information is not inside the workflow – these solutions are not actionable immediately.

We believe that the only way to achieve the best outcomes is through frictionless data solutions that provide actionable insights that net immediate, holistic results. Of course, too much data can be overwhelming, so how do we maximize data intelligence for specialists without disrupting the quality of patient care?

That very question is what led to the development of SRS EHR Smart Workflows®. We’ve replaced complexity with streamlined data relevancy in a way that helps provide the frictionless clinical experience of the future…today.

So while we continue to hear all about the amazing healthcare technologies that are on the horizon, let’s remember to turn our gaze inward. Because when it comes to best outcomes, the best solutions are about what is on the inside. Just like the best people.

Mark Your 2017 Calendars!

To help you keep track of your year, we’ve created this 2017 quick reference calendar that you can refer to for conference dates and important holidays. Looking forward to another exciting year!

Be sure to check our website for upcoming industry hot topic SRS Webinars.

2017-calendar-infographic-FINAL-v2

A New Data Has Dawned

new-srs-blog-v2As we all prepare for another year of change in the healthcare industry, it is my privilege to share a big change of our own: SRSsoft is now SRS Health!

Why would we change our name, our logo, and our tagline? And what does this mean to our clients?

During our 20 years of innovation, the healthcare technology field has been radically transformed. So has SRS. What began as a document management company is now something completely different. We have reinvented SRS as a data solutions company that can help drive better care and better outcomes for our clients today…and in the future. That’s more than an evolution; it’s a revolutionary change worthy of rebranding.

Our Name                                                                                                                         Why did we add “health” to our name? The new moniker comes from our expertise at supporting your expertise: patient health and practice health. Our flexible data platform and integrated best-of-breed approach allows specialists to utilize HCIT in a way that improves the experience for their patients and their practice.

Our Logo                                                                                                                         The orb shape of the logo represents the continuum of engaging patients before, during, and after their visits. It represents the perfect balance of improved efficiency with proven outcomes.  And it represents the unending dedication of our team to remain in motion as we continue to pioneer the HCIT solutions of the future. The fiery color of our logo represents the passion and commitment of our people to ensure client satisfaction.

Our Tagline                                                                                                                             “Intelligent Data Solutions.” For specialists, these three words simply haven’t gone together in a way that provided the types of benefits that SRS Health offers. That’s because the EHR marketplace caters to generalists. Finally, these focused practices can escape the data dark ages with HCIT solutions that are predictive, connective, and exactly what the (specialist) doctor ordered.

To find out more about what’s behind the new SRS Health, I invite you to watch our new video. I think you’ll agree that it really is the dawning of a new data!

Wishing you SRS Health and happiness in the New Year,

Scott