About Diane Beatini

Diane Beatini is the Vice President of Sales. She oversees the Sales, Account Management, and Sales Operations teams. She works to promote the complete SRS product suite of HCIT solutions to medical practices of varied sizes and specialties. Diane’s background includes an MBA in marketing and finance with 15 years of executive sales and customer service management experience in the radiology, medical device, and pharmaceutical industries.

Enterprise Growth in the Ambulatory Space – The Benefits & Challenges

“Leadership is the challenge to be something more than average.” Jim Rohn

trees-growth-39281207_sEnterprise growth is an emerging trend in the ambulatory specialty space. The shift to a value-based market with an emphasis on quality rather than volume, together with associated pressures in the healthcare landscape, has fueled the consolidation of individual practices into super groups.

This trend was a predictive model and growth strategy for hospital systems as the shift to value-based care loomed on the horizon. Hospitals understood the need to grow by becoming better—leveraging cost, quality, and service advantages to attract key decision-makers as opposed to pursuing prior, price-extractive growth strategies that were driven purely by increasing size through acquisitions and expanded market share. (Advisory Board: Health System Growth Strategy for the Value-Based Market)

A similar shift is occurring with ambulatory specialty practices, which face challenges from declining reimbursement, increased costs, changes in government regulatory requirements with the advent of MACRA/MIPs, hospital system pressure and competition, and the shift from a fee-for-service model to value-based care. Physicians have realized that, in order to remain independent and profitable, they need to come together and create regional—and in some cases statewide—groups united under a common brand name and/or the formation of clinically integrated networks (CINs).

Enterprise growth empowers physicians to practice independently and compete with area hospitals and health systems. Enterprise specialty groups are a strong sustainable alternative to hospital employment and they support ancillary growth opportunities like ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs), urgent care, imaging, and physical therapy locations. They provide a platform from which to negotiate local/state/national contracts inclusive of malpractice premiums, and to direct employer opportunities. This bargaining power allows for a reduction in overhead together with an improved revenue stream. Enterprise groups also have the advantage of scale to tackle infrastructure and HCIT investments, improvements, customizations, and maintenance.

In any industry, growth through acquisition and consolidation brings challenges. It’s not easy to merge management, staff, locations, and office cultures—it requires strong leadership and governance. A unified community-facing brand, a shared growth strategy /approach, and the development of KPIs are key determinants of success. Performance metrics may include market share, geographic reach, patient growth vs. physician density, annual revenue by specialty, total cost of care, and outcomes quality. Other important considerations are developing an integrated approach for human resources, employment contracts, health and malpractice plans, purchasing/procurement, and Bundled Payments for Care Improvements (BPCI).

The emerging organization must keep the community it serves as its top priority as it transitions and the pieces come together. The main driver of enterprise growth—the need to demonstrate quality outcomes and low-cost episodic care—also serves as the attraction for referral sources within the surrounding medical community and their consumers, the patients.

Done well, the demonstration of quality outcomes will support a strong brand reputation, providing the necessary bargaining power needed with payers and employers. To accomplish this, many groups seek a common HCIT platform for patient engagement, regulatory compliance, and outcomes reporting. While this represents yet another change during a time of transition, the right HCIT partner is an integral part of the success of the organization. Other key considerations are the ability to integrate these solutions to drive a seamless experience for both the clinician and the patient. Equally important is that the HCIT solution participates in a collaborative dialogue regarding ongoing needs, and supports each individual specialist’s clinical workflow preferences and patient volume while providing reliable, dedicated, hands-on support.

Hot Topics for Orthopaedics

SRS Health attends the annual OrthoForums and AAOS meetings as a way of remaining in sync with the topics that are top of mind for our clients. As an HCIT solutions partner, we are continually striving to provide our clients with relevant solutions, training, and advice on resources so that they can meet challenges head on while remaining productive and focused on the practice of medicine. The forums and academy meetings provide us with additional insight outside of our day-to-day interactions, and often serve as springboards for our collaborative efforts.

This year, the prominent topics in the orthopaedic community include:

  • prescription safety
  • data mining/outcomes;
  • cost reduction/operational efficiencies; and
  • MACRA/ MIPs readiness.

Prescription safety has gained increased focus as numerous studies and reports focus on the increased use and abuse of opioids. As a result, individual states are beginning to enact laws addressing the prescribing of controlled substances. Electronic prescribing of controlled substances (EPCS) is currently legal in all 50 states. New York State was the first to pass mandatory I-Stop legislation requiring ePrescribing of all drugs, with stringent identity authentication requirements for controlled substances as of March 27, 2016. Maine has followed suit with the Act to Prevent Opiate Abuse by Strengthening the Controlled Substances Prescription Monitoring Program, requiring prescriber participation in the Prescription Monitoring Program and setting limits for the strength and duration of opioid prescriptions, beginning January 2017. The law also called for prescribers to undergo addiction training every two years. On February 23, 2017, New Jersey issued a bulletin regarding State Opioid Prescribing Information, alerting prescribers to components of a law governing opioid prescribing that takes effect in May. Minnesota also has a similar CDS law on its books, although not as strictly enforced. The expectation is that stringent monitoring will only become more prevalent, with mandatory requirements that will include patient education. As a result, many providers have voluntarily adopted EPCS practices, and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has created a multimedia public service campaign, including display and radio ads, urging physicians and patients to exercise caution in prescribing and taking opioids.Painkillers Campaign Image2

As we embrace the value-based payment model, data mining and patient-reported outcomes are top of mind. The critical piece to the puzzle is the ability to collect and report on pertinent and meaningful data to demonstrate improved outcomes. Many physicians are currently considering the selection of an outcomes solution to integrate within their existing HCIT ecosystem. There is no firm consensus across the orthopaedic space of what constitutes full outcomes data requirements, and many are focused on choosing an optimal solution that delivers minimal PRO requirements—i.e., HOOS (Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores) and KOOS (Knee injury & Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores)—at the right price point.

As the payment model shifts and practices are faced with additional reporting complexities, the ability to drive operational efficiency and reduce costs is a critical focus. Integral to all related topics—prescription safety and the ability to demonstrate outcomes, drive down operating costs and meet regulatory requirements under MACRA/MIPs—is the ability to streamline the patient intake process, satisfy the VDT, meet secure messaging requirements, and integrate patient reported data through a quality patient-portal solution. Core functional capabilities such as ease of use and access; ability to request appointments; facilitated patient communication through notifications; integration of patient information within the EHR; and the enabling of secure messaging/exchange allow orthopaedic practices to reduce the time and resources devoted to patient intake and data input, as well as to limit appointment cancellations and/or no shows. Adoption of a patient-engagement solution supports 20 points under MIPs in 2017 and up to 40 points in 2018 with the addition of patient education. The portal also becomes a critical focal point to enhancing patient care through an ongoing dialogue and supporting patient education.

MACRA/MIPs readiness and the assurance that the EHR software employed by the practice will be 2015 certified is also a topic of interest as the marketplace continues to consolidate and EHR solutions sunset. At the outset of the MU program formulated through the HITECH Act of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (also known as the 2009 Economic Stimulus Plan), there were over 500 EHR solutions vendors. Today there are fewer than 300, with continued consolidation expected as companies decide whether to further invest and develop to the 2015 certification requirements. Practices should have regular dialogue with their HCIT solutions vendors regarding their investment and plans to certify; and also the availability of MACRA/MIPs training programs to support their regulatory goals.

What We’re Grateful for—Our Clients!

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I joined the SRS Sales Management Team in 2012. One of the attractions to join the SRS Team was the corporate culture — an environment that fostered cross-functional communication, interdependency, and most importantly, client evangelism. At the time, SRS employees were referred to as ETPs, which is an acronym for Eager to Please. This attitude permeated the entire organization from the top down and is still present today. In fact, under our CEO Scott Ciccarelli, this founding principle has been taken a step further by involving the voice of the SRS client in our design and development process. Through our Client Advisory Board and User Centric Design Groups, our clients work with our development teams to provide valuable feedback, clinical insight, and recommended enhancements to our software. This process allows SRS to truly serve our clients as a business partner and ensure they are pleased as we release new innovations.

All of us at SRS are grateful for our clients, not only for their valued support, but for their invaluable feedback, which has allowed SRS to evolve from an expertise in transitioning high-volume specialty practices from paper into being a flexible, data-driven, full-HCIT-solutions partner. Through the voice of our clients, SRS continues to evolve, improve, and thrive!

So as Thanksgiving approaches, we would like to give thanks for our clients and recognize how much they have given back to the SRS Team throughout the year.

Our clients keep us human. Many of the departments within SRS are client-facing and work with clinicians and staff on a daily basis to answer questions, interpret government regulations, solve workflow issues, and support the SRS product suite. The SRS Account Management Team serves as a single point of contact and will often act as the advocate for the practice, ensuring all of their needs are met and they get the information they need without having to speak with several people. Through this consistent contact, we develop close working relationships with our clients and truly care about them, not only on a professional level, but on a personal level as well. Our clients keep us human when they share stories about the challenges and triumphs they face in their clinics and in their personal lives. These working relationships allow us to take pride in our work and feel a connection that makes our jobs more meaningful.

Our clients make us feel as if we are making a difference. It’s no secret that physicians and their clinical staff prefer to focus their efforts on their patients rather than on HCIT solutions. Our clients make us feel valued when they express excitement over our efforts to streamline a clinical workflow, develop and improve a form, or drive efficiencies through the creation of clinical protocols. As we improve their user experience and interaction with the software, we also feel as if we have helped to improve the doctor/patient experience.

Our clients advocate for us. The hallways at SRS corporate headquarters are lined with framed letters of recognition from clients. Most were written following the implementation and go-live process, and they recognize the dedicated Implementation Specialist assigned to the project who made everything come together—allowing for a smooth transition. Our clients have been, and continue to be, the best form of advertising for SRS, promoting their individual experiences and referring their colleagues and affiliates. This recognition is invaluable and allows us to grow and continue to innovate to support them.

For all that you do, we are forever grateful to the SRS client family and extend our best wishes to you and your families for a wonderful Thanksgiving holiday!

Sincerely,

Diane Beatini

The Key to Growing Your Practice

blog-key-093014If there is one thing both physicians and vendors readily agree on, it is the ever-
changing healthcare landscape—driven by legislation, government programs, and technology. This changing environment poses a challenge for medical practices and businesses alike to retain and attract new patients/clients in order to prosper and thrive.

How can a medical practice operate like a successful business? It all starts with creating a marketing plan that includes clear goals, an identified target market, powerful tactics to reach your target market, and metrics to measure your success. The marketing plan acts as a roadmap by clearly stating goals, laying out a tactical plan of action to achieve them, and identifying the right measurements to ensure a successful outcome. Clearly defined goals might include a targeted number of new patient visits/follow-up visits/procedures per month. Not only is the goal clearly defined, it is timely, and measurable.

The tactical portion of your marketing plan will identify the ways in which you plan to reach your target audience. Today, patients search for information online. This makes your website the focal point of your practice’s online presence. It should be up to date, accurate, and user-friendly. Both your website and social media can help position your practice as an educational resource by providing videos concerning disease-state awareness, detailing procedures, and exposing patients to educational information about practice resources and expertise.

Having the right technology can also help you reach your goals. For example, you can leverage your EHR to run reports identifying a subset of patients (target audience) inclusive of demographics, frequency of visits, diagnoses, and procedures. These reports can be used to assist in communicating with these patients to drive follow-up visits.

In addition, push notifications such as e-mails can be sent through the patient portal to request appointments or to communicate with patients. The use of a portal cuts down on phone calls and paper, representing a significant financial savings and creating an efficient flow of patients through the waiting room. Print materials placed strategically at check-in and check-out points can also help educate patients, and drive portal usage.

Developing and implementing a marketing plan for your practice will place you ahead of the competition, in front of patients and referral sources, and increase your revenue base.