Is Healthcare Hi-Tech Enough?

Barbara Mullarky

Barbara Mullarky

Director, Product Management at SRS Health
Barbara has had a successful career in the healthcare industry, working for both vendors and healthcare provider organizations. She has held roles in sales, marketing, product management and professional services, working with EMR and department-focused solutions for the laboratory and imaging.

Prior to becoming the Director of Product Management at SRS, Barbara was with GE Healthcare (now GE Digital), where she held the positions of Senior Product Marketing Manager for Centricity imaging products, Product Marketing Manager and Customer Collaboration Leader for what is now Caradigm, and Upstream Marketing Manager for Centricity Laboratory. Barbara also worked at the University of Arizona Medical Center, where she managed a team that was responsible for implementing and maintaining 27 departmental IT solutions, the ambulatory EMR and the patient safety initiatives; Wyndgate Technologies (now Haemonetics); Sunquest Information Systems and Community Medical Center.

Originally from New Jersey, Barbara now lives in Tucson, AZ. She is a graduate of the West Virginia University College of Medicine and is a registered Medical Technologist. When not at work, she loves traveling, taking photographs, watching football and spending time with her two Brittanys.
Barbara Mullarky

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315x236-Devices-med-iconsThe answer to that question depends on what part of the healthcare continuum you look at. When it comes to the actual treatment of disease, few fields can compare with medicine in terms of developing and incorporating new technology. Think of cyber knives, genetically guided cancer therapies, complex new drugs for autoimmune diseases, and the way that surgery has become increasingly less invasive through its reliance on computer imaging and magnification for micro-, laparoscopic, and robot assisted surgery.

On the other hand, when it comes to the use of information technology, healthcare hasn’t been nearly as forward looking as, say, banking, or travel, or even the food industry. How often have you visited a highly respected doctor, located in state-of-the-art facilities, and had to spend half an hour filling out pages of badly xeroxed forms, asking redundant and often irrelevant questions about your personal health history? How often has a member of your doctor’s staff had to spend the time to call you to remind you of an appointment? How often have you wasted time trying to reach your doctor by phone to ask a simple question about your treatment?

Fortunately, the landscape is changing. The industry is starting to engage patients in new ways, using text messaging, video conferencing, and wearable devices to keep patients actively in the therapeutic loop rather than simply at the passive, receiving end. And it’s about time.

According to Pew research:

  • 88% of Americans use the Internet
  • 73% have broadband service at home
  • 95% of us carry a cell phone of some type
  • 62% of those have used their phone in the past year to look up information about a health condition.

Those numbers don’t surprise me. As I write this, I am sitting in O’Hare Airport and almost everyone in the departure lounge has a smart phone in his or her hand. Urban legend has it that people under 55 like to text while people over 60 prefer to make phone calls, but if O’Hare is any indication, the over-60 crowd is just as tech savvy as the younger generation. They’re checking the airline app—this happens to be a really bad travel day fraught with weather delays—so that they can text their families and friends with updates. In 2013, Exerpian Marketing found that adults over 55 send almost 500 text messages a month. I’m sure that number is much higher today.

So why not take advantage of this in your practice? Phones and texting allow you to engage with your patients in a whole new way. You can text them appointment reminders (my hair dresser has been doing it for years), let them know if your office is closed due to inclement weather, or notify them that it’s time to make an appointment to have their eyes checked.

Mobile devices can also be used as an electronic physician’s assistant, with apps to guide care and improve outcomes. Imagine if patients could log onto an app on their phones that reminded them of exercises they had to do that day, showed a video of how to do those exercises, recorded that the exercises had been done as well as the patient pain level and other progress indicators . . . and then automatically transmitted all of this information to the physician to become part of their charts. And that all this happened without the time and expense of the doctor’s staff having to make personal calls.

Even better, imagine that you, as the patient, could see your doctor without leaving your home or office. While video technology has been around for a long time, traditional physician practices have been slow to adopt teleservices. This is partly because state regulations and reimbursement policies have not encouraged it, outside of the few online physician services offering quick and relatively easy consults on a “pay now for service” basis. However, more and more states are passing legislation that allow doctors to establish provider-patient relationships through face-to-face interactive, two-way, real-time communication, or through store-and-forward technologies. In addition, some of the laws call out payment policies, and require that care provided via teleservices be billed the same as an in-office visit. I’d personally love it if my doctor adopted teleservices—it would save me the 30-minute drive to her office, the 10 minutes spent parking, the 20-minute delay because she is usually running late, and the 30-minute drive home. Instead, her office could text me when she’s ready and we could engage for 15 minutes via a telemedicine system. A lot better than the minimum 90+ minutes to do an in-person visit.

The final frontier is when healthcare manages to combine information technology with its existing drive for advanced treatment technology. One university research team is developing a tracking device that could be embedded in a pill; the device would activate when the patient took the medication, sending a message to a receiver app, which in turn would create a record for family members or physicians to review. This may initially sound a little too invasive, but think of the boon for families caring for an elder relative—they could verify that the correct meds were taken without having to hire an on-site care-giver or to make daily trips to ensure compliance.

What’s common to all these new technologies is that they recognize that the patient is at the center of the care team, and the information the patient provides must be incorporated into the therapeutic process in real time. The sooner we engage patients in their own care, the better outcomes we will all experience—and the technology that we are already using every day can help us get there. Is the healthcare you are providing hi-tech enough? What technology are you using now to advance your patient engagement?

Outcomes: It’s What’s Inside That Counts

Scott Ciccarelli

Scott Ciccarelli

CEO at SRS Health
Scott Ciccarelli, Chief Executive Officer at SRS, has more than 20 years of diverse management and operations experience garnered as a senior executive at GE, where he headed two of the company’s businesses—most recently, GE Healthcare’s Services, Ambulatory and Revenue Cycle Solutions. His areas of expertise include business strategy, leadership development, operational rigor (Lean Six Sigma), and the delivery of enhanced value for customers through quality improvement and innovation.
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lightbulb-gears-blogTwo weeks ago, more than 40,000 people came together to network, share, and learn more about health data management at HIMSS17. As expected, we heard about the latest developments in top tech trends of tomorrow like artificial intelligence, data security and virtual care. One of the hottest discussion topics by this highly focused group was how to improve patient and practice health through meaningful and usable analytics. After much time listening to and participating in conversations on this critical subject matter, we are more committed than ever to helping our clients improve patient care through outcomes, and when it comes to outcomes, it’s what’s inside that counts.

What do I mean by that? This familiar phrase has been shared from generation to generation when describing what’s important about people. So how can these words of wisdom about humanity possibly apply to HCIT and outcomes for specialty medicine practices? It’s more appropriate than you might think…

In an ambulatory setting, specialist teams need the ability to analyze and make decisions within their HCIT ecosystem. They need insight within their workflow. They need to know how to deliver the best care at a lower cost. And the only way to do this in today’s data-driven world is by bringing insight and analytics inside their workflow. Not outside.

External solutions focus on providing isolated results rather than a holistic approach to patient and practice health. What’s an outside solution? It’s anything that requires you to offload data, thereby taking you out of the ecosphere. If that data is not contained in the ecosphere – if the information is not inside the workflow – these solutions are not actionable immediately.

We believe that the only way to achieve the best outcomes is through frictionless data solutions that provide actionable insights that net immediate, holistic results. Of course, too much data can be overwhelming, so how do we maximize data intelligence for specialists without disrupting the quality of patient care?

That very question is what led to the development of SRS EHR Smart Workflows®. We’ve replaced complexity with streamlined data relevancy in a way that helps provide the frictionless clinical experience of the future…today.

So while we continue to hear all about the amazing healthcare technologies that are on the horizon, let’s remember to turn our gaze inward. Because when it comes to best outcomes, the best solutions are about what is on the inside. Just like the best people.

The Hills Are Alive…With the Sound of a New SRS!

Scott Ciccarelli

Scott Ciccarelli

CEO at SRS Health
Scott Ciccarelli, Chief Executive Officer at SRS, has more than 20 years of diverse management and operations experience garnered as a senior executive at GE, where he headed two of the company’s businesses—most recently, GE Healthcare’s Services, Ambulatory and Revenue Cycle Solutions. His areas of expertise include business strategy, leadership development, operational rigor (Lean Six Sigma), and the delivery of enhanced value for customers through quality improvement and innovation.
Scott Ciccarelli

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mountain-blogI love that our annual event is called the SRS User Summit – because this year, the news was so good that I wanted to shout it from the top of the tallest mountain! (Or, maybe sing it, but I’m no von Trapp family member…) Every member of the SRS team felt the same way. Thankfully, after hearing our big news, so did the clients who attended.

Here’s the shout-worthy news: SRS has completely transformed into an intelligent data-focused solutions provider. Our days of being a document management company are behind us. And rather than tweaking existing template-based systems as many of our competitors have chosen to do, we pioneered a specialist-oriented solution that simply doesn’t exist elsewhere. We have invented a new approach to data that is totally revolutionary – balancing speed, efficiency, data collection and sharing.

Why? Demands on medical practices have become even steeper, and the main path followed by other HCIT vendors won’t help specialists reach their goals. That’s why SRS is carving out new trails in order to provide the level of partnership that is needed today and tomorrow. Together, we will achieve:

  • Better patient engagement
  • Better clinical outcomes
  • Better operational efficiency

I know that’s a lot to claim. That’s exactly why I was so excited to unveil the new SRS at the User Summit: because as someone with a high say/do ratio, I’m thrilled to say that we can back up every claim we are making! Here are a few examples of what’s available now, and what is coming soon:

TODAY

  • Patient Engagement Platform– streamline the registration process by enhancing the digital intake experience and reduce appointment “no shows” with automated reminders. Influence patient behavior through meaningful engagement in both pre and post visit by customizing patient forms to practice requirements, and leveraging patients to complete forms online before their appointment.
  • Smart Workflows –our revolutionary patent pending Smart Workflows allow you to collect more data and quickly document patient encounters with customizable workflows, provide standardized care efficiently through protocols, drive compliance with regulatory and quality improvement initiatives, and demonstrate the value of your services through analytics and outcomes.
  • Data Interoperability – capture then share discrete clinical data with other information systems across all parts of the healthcare network through the use of our APIs.

TOMORROW

  • Flexible Data Platform –capture the data you want, when you want, and how you want with our data capture platform. It empowers users to drill down and capture and report on any discrete data point that is truly relevant to them.
  • Integrated Best of Breed – enjoy the seamless user experience of our tightly integrated healthcare IT ecosystem—including EHR, Practice Management, Patient Portal, and Transcription—each selected for their ability to serve high-performance specialists and to easily integrate with your practice’s other HCIT solutions.
  • Patient Population – improve patient outcomes through tailored outreach campaigns that educate them post encounter, as well as setting up reminders and sending out surveys to collect more relevant data.

Of course, some things about SRS remain the same – and we promise, they won’t change! For example, we will continue to guide you through regulatory compliance, thanks to our own governmental Sherpa, Lynn Scheps, who has already dug into the 2,398 pages of the new MACRA rule released a week ago.  Plus, the superb client service for which we are known will continue to be core to the SRS experience.

We understand that the future will continue to be an uphill climb. But with SRS by your side, you’ll have the right tools on the right paths. Now that is something to sing about!

Data Done Differently

Khal Rai

Khal Rai

Senior Vice President, Development at SRS Health
Khal oversees the Software Engineering, Business Analysis, Quality Assurance, and Product Management teams at SRS. His 17+ years’ experience in software development and healthcare IT have resulted in a true passion for collaborating with customers, then translating their needs into innovative solutions and better service experiences. He believes that motivated employees and satisfied customers are keys to maintaining business success. He has a B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University.
Khal Rai

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data-funnelAs I mentioned in my previous post, The Truth Is Stranger Than Friction, some physicians are so dissatisfied with their EHRs that they wish they could return to the days of paper charts. The main culprit is the data collection process, which causes friction between doctors and patients. I argued that workflows should, first of all, adapt to each doctor’s style so that doctors can concentrate on patients rather than technology, and, second, enable seamless data collection during patient interactions so that doctors don’t waste time recording data later. Traditionally, EHRs have been vendor-led in how they were built rather than being designed around how clients wanted to use them.

The role of an HCIT vendor is to understand its clients’ and prospects’ requirements. This step is often overlooked. We are seeing huge dissatisfaction in practices’ experiences with their current EHR solution. This can be seen with the impact these solutions have on the doctor-patient relationship; many practices have seen a reduction in the amount of face-to-face time with patients, as well as a decrease in the number of patients they can see.

According to a recent Medscape study, 45% of patients made complaints either occasionally or frequently about lack of eye contact, excessive questions, or providers focusing more on the equipment than the exam. On top of that, a recent article on Healthcare Scene reinforces that doctors are frustrated by using EHRs because they don’t match their workflows, feel clunky, and require too much time for documentation. The article goes on to say that these frustrations lead to both physician burnout and a decrease in EHR use.

However, is technology the culprit? No. I believe these problems are not a reflection on the technology. We see in other industries how technology has been optimized to improve business operations and improve customer satisfaction. I would argue that the fundamental problem with EHRs is a lack of understanding of what challenges practices face, and how to accommodate and plan for both today and tomorrow’s needs. This lack of understanding usually results in a poor implementation plan that is set up to fail from day one. Unfortunately, with the move toward a valued-based model, this misunderstanding is likely to cause even more problems.

What is needed is not only a way to capture and share relevant data, but a way to do this without disrupting the physician’s workflow. This is especially important for specialty practices with a high-volume of patients. Workflows should be personalized so they fit around the physician’s way of working rather than interfering with it, and a crucial part of this is cutting out the clutter and showing only relevant information as defined by the physician and practice.

Our team’s philosophy has always been to put the clients’ requirements first in everything we do. We work closely with clients to understand their workflow, and then we provide a solution that improves their operations in a way that makes sense to them. Our years of experience in providing best-of-breed specialty solutions to ambulatory practices has given us a strong appreciation of the importance of designing an agile solution that effectively handles a high-volume patient intake and put through while improving practices’ bottom line.

When it comes to data, we feel just as strongly, if not more so! We want to enable seamless data collection during patient interactions, so that doctors are not spending hours recording data later. We want to empower practices to determine who should capture the data they want, when and how they want, in the context of patient encounter. This means providing a flexible solution that is future-proof, leveraging mobile platforms and predictive technologies, while incorporating Outcomes and Analytics that not only keep up with busy specialists, but actually help move them forward.

That is what we mean by data done differently.

Frictionless Product Delivery

Khal Rai

Khal Rai

Senior Vice President, Development at SRS Health
Khal oversees the Software Engineering, Business Analysis, Quality Assurance, and Product Management teams at SRS. His 17+ years’ experience in software development and healthcare IT have resulted in a true passion for collaborating with customers, then translating their needs into innovative solutions and better service experiences. He believes that motivated employees and satisfied customers are keys to maintaining business success. He has a B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University.
Khal Rai

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upgradeWhat if I told you that software deployment could be simple? You’d likely accuse me of smuggling Kahlua into my morning coffee. It seems like only yesterday that installations required CDs and that every workstation needed hands-on attention. Once you got to a particular unit, you would be greeted with an array of screens and prompts that could conceivably require hours of monitoring. Allow me to assure you that those days are over!

The term “innovation” is usually applied only to product development, but at SRS, we have pushed this approach to all facets of what we do, including procedures and processes. One of our many innovations this year has been the incorporation of a software deployment tool, which silently installs applications without user interaction.

While I would love to take all of the credit for this major advancement, I can’t. We first heard about it during our IT Round Table collaboration session at our User Summit last year when we were discussing the tools IT professionals use for software, patches, and file deployments across their infrastructure.  All were pleasantly surprised by the ease of use, consistency, reliability, and advanced options offered by this software deployment tool, and they all agreed that it was much more reliable than Group Policy deployments and other well-known software deployment tools on the market. We took this feedback and did our homework.

How does this Software Deployment Tool benefit you?

  • Quick and easy deployments – only one resource needed to create and deploy a package across multiple sites without any user interaction
  • Deployments scheduled at your convenience
  • Detailed report provided in real time during and after the deployment is completed
  • No prior technical knowledge required

In some cases, the workstation deployment time of an SRS upgrade has been reduced from 3.5 hours to 20 minutes. That is an outstanding 90% improvement! A simple adjustment to your process can have a dramatic impact on both the time and cost spent in the deployment process.

You must be wondering, “There has to be a catch!” I assure you, there isn’t! Perhaps the best part is that there’s no need to review a complex manual. At SRS, we provide training and testing, and have confirmed that non-technical users can configure the deployment and re-use it without our assistance—it’s that easy!

Whether your focus is software development or deployment, or sales or marketing, innovation designed to remove friction will always lead to increased efficiencies and better results!

How the Evolution Started in Data-Capture Technology

Adam Curran

Adam Curran

Product Marketing Manager at SRS Health
Adam Curran is a Product Marketing Manager at SRS. He oversees marketing intelligence to support the development of strategic marketing plans. Prior to joining the organization, he was a key member of a pharmaceutical software company’s Clinical Development Business Unit, specializing in the clinical data management elements of the drug development lifecycle. He was also the editor for their microsite’s blog. Adam has also held roles at the UK’s National Energy Foundation and Skills Funding Agency.
Adam Curran

EvolutionDo you remember the days when cell phones were brand new? I am not referring to the Nokia 3310 (back when all we needed was a single game, Snake – simpler times . . .). I am talking about when they were first launched and introduced. Those were the days when cell phones were only purchased by business people and you could only make calls near a transmitter tower (oh how mobile!). They used to come with big cases, but these were not for the phone itself; their real purpose was to hold the phone’s huge battery! Despite that, the purpose of original cell phones was clear—to make phone calls on the move. Well, so long as you were going past at least one transmitter tower on the way . . .

Fast-forward to today—the cell phone we once knew has completely changed, and along with it, we see a transformation in how people see and use their phones. What used to be their original purpose (making phone calls) has now been virtually replaced by activities such as Internet browsing, checking social networks, shopping, listening to music, and playing games (you can still download Snake, but it’s no longer pre-installed!).

It would probably be more fitting to call them powerful mini-computers; the average smartphone today is millions of times more powerful than all of NASA’s combined computing power in 1969. Smartphones today are even powerful enough to run old Windows operating systems such as Windows 95. Good to know for all those old-operating-system enthusiasts who want a bit of nostalgia on the go.

The evolution of cell phones eventually led to a revolution in the market. The pace at which technology was developing eventually led to the creation of the first iPhone—the rest is history!

So how does the evolution and revolution in cell phones relate to data-capture technology? Just as the first cell phones had only one purpose—talking—data capture nowadays means simply sharing or collecting information. While 1990s-era electronic data capture focused almost exclusively on big data associated with clinical trials such as EDC and electronic patient reported outcomes (ePRO), it was eventually adapted for private medical practice. Over the years, the opportunities afforded by electronic data capture have grown, partly because of healthcare costs.

However, although these first digital data-capture systems offered some relief to physicians and other users, they were still time-consuming and cumbersome, creating more productivity issues than they solved. What was meant to save time actually had the opposite effect; while the new systems were being introduced, they actually resulted in physicians seeing fewer patients.

Back then, these solutions were designed for primary-care physicians. Specialists, who needed to maintain smaller sets of data, found that these first digital systems did not take their specific needs into account. What specialists required was a solution that would allow them to see many patients without sacrificing data quality and regulatory compliance. Fortunately, there were a few vendors who had the insight to rise up to the challenge and help to solve these specialty-specific problems.

To find out more about the evolution of data capture and how EHR solutions are becoming revolutionary—like smartphones—read our recent whitepaper on this topic.

What is HCIT Friction?

Khal Rai

Khal Rai

Senior Vice President, Development at SRS Health
Khal oversees the Software Engineering, Business Analysis, Quality Assurance, and Product Management teams at SRS. His 17+ years’ experience in software development and healthcare IT have resulted in a true passion for collaborating with customers, then translating their needs into innovative solutions and better service experiences. He believes that motivated employees and satisfied customers are keys to maintaining business success. He has a B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University.
Khal Rai

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wheelThe Truth Is Stranger Than Friction

I just returned from two eye-opening experiences: HIMSS, the largest health IT event in the industry, and AAOS, the country’s largest orthopaedic conference. Of course, I heard about the amazing benefits of many new technological and medical breakthroughs . . . But what really got my attention was hearing some physicians say that when it comes to productivity, they wish they could return to the days of paper charts.

What? Since when do medical professionals want to turn back time on medical technology advancements like productivity solutions? All of those innovations were designed with an important goal in mind: to help doctors have more time to help more patients. However, due to many reasons, the data collection process is getting in between doctors and patients. That friction is rubbing both parties the wrong way—and the need to get beyond that friction was the clear message I took away from both HIMSS and AAOS.

Friction isn’t inherently bad: it is the force that allows our tires to grip the pavement, lets us steer the way we want to go, and enables our brakes to stop us from crashing. However, excess friction hinders movement and wastes energy: that’s what’s happening right now in the world of EHR solutions. What we need are systems that work with—not against—physicians while they perform their very important work. By creating smarter solutions, we can transform friction into traction: positive momentum that takes us where we want to go, faster—in a way that enhances, instead of interferes with, the doctor-patient experience.

In order to really help advance healthcare, the next generation of EHR solutions must do more than just capture data. They must be intelligent technologies that go beyond frictionless, creating the traction to:

  • Operate in the way that best supports each doctor’s work style, so that physicians can concentrate on patients, not iPads
  • Enable seamless data collection during patient interactions, so that doctors are not spending hours recording data later
  • Leverage mobile platforms and predictive technologies that not only keep up with busy specialists but actually help move them forward

Turning meaningless friction into meaningful traction is the driving force behind what we are calling Smart Workflows. Living and practicing in the Information Age, the only way to go is forward—not to reduce the technology involved, but to reduce its intrusiveness by developing software that easily captures required data while actually prioritizing the physician’s role in medicine. That’s something no EHR has ever done—nor any paper chart, for that matter.

To frictionless and beyond!

~ Khal Rai