Reimagining a Stable Future

Lester Parada

Lester Parada

Director of Professional Services at SRS Health
Lester Parada is the Director of Professional Services overseeing the Implementation, Training & Consulting and Forms teams. He has a background in business development, product management, project management and client relations. His passion lies in maximizing client value by optimizing workflows and technology.Lester is a certified PMP, SCM and CSPO and has an MBA with a concentration in marketing.
Lester Parada

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stable-future-blog-v2HHS Secretary Tom Price, an orthopaedic surgeon, stated weeks ago that he wants to “reimagine” the federal department. I would humbly suggest—and hope—that one of the items he “reimagines” is the process by which policy is implemented as it relates healthcare technology.

Since 2011, the healthcare IT (HCIT) sector has been severely hampered by policy uncertainty. Each year, new guidelines and certification criteria are presented. These usually receive some negative reactions from healthcare providers, and then amended as the timelines extend or change. Many times, the policies have been changed a mere two months before their scheduled start date. For providers, the noise around these policy changes creates an environment in which uncertainty avoidance becomes a priority. That means retiring early, merging with a hospital or a larger group to share risks, putting off expansion plans and capital expenditures, and other strategies. For HCIT companies, it means not funding innovation and being forced to focusing on more and more functionality that customers do not value.

In macroeconomics the term “C bar” refers to “the autonomous real consumption expenditures by consumers but as it relates to their confidence.” In layman’s terms, it is the current outlook that consumers have towards the economy and their own financial situation. It reflects their level of confidence or lack thereof. A good level of confidence increases consumers’ likelihood to spend and borrow (otherwise known as their marginal propensity to consume). A poor level signals economic contraction is ahead. It is affected by many factors in our complex economy like housing prices, unemployment, and inflation. However, nothing affects confidence more than uncertainty! In general, when consumers sense they are not reasonably confident of what the future outcome of something will be, they pull back from the table and wait.

You can see evidence of this exact macroeconomic principle in healthcare today. I would venture a guess that if we tracked healthcare’s C bar, we would see that we are in negative territory and likely have been for years.

What we need is stability and a clear direction forward: setting policy and requirements early, providing sufficient time to implement changes, and then not surprising the industry with last-minute changes or corrections. Once confidence is restored, I believe that both providers and HCIT companies will experience a mini boom as all of the delayed investments and innovations work their way back into the sector.

 

If You Build It, Will They Come?

Luis Marcos

Luis Marcos

Senior Operations Manager at SRS Health
Luis began his tenure with SRS-Health nearly 8 years ago as an Implementation Specialist. In that time, his attention to detail and planning garnered accolades from clients and colleagues alike, making him a star within the department. In 2015, he shifted his attention to organizational project management with an emphasis on operational efficiency while overseeing activities in Professional Services. His focus shifted in mid-2016 and he now oversees the activities of both the Support and Service Delivery Teams.
Luis Marcos

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Let’s take a moment and talk about the ideal development-to-adoption scenario. For the sake of the exercise, you’re Kevin Costner. You hear a whisper about building it. You continue to explore what it is until you realize that you have been asked to build a baseball field. Through hard work and perseverance, the request becomes reality. In no time at all, ghost baseball players emerge from behind corn stalks and play a game.

That right there folks, is the dream of every software developer. They aspire to build what you need and then have you faithfully use their creation. Alas, like Field of Dreams (beautiful film), that aspiration typically falls under the genre of fantasy.

How can that be? Why wouldn’t a user take advantage of an enhancement to their software? Truth be told, there are number of reasons as to why, including, but not limited to:

  1. Lack of awareness.
  2. Aversion to change.
  3. The functionality doesn’t meet your exact needs.
  4. The perceived effort of deploying the change outweighs the benefit.

As an end user, you should want and need to maximize the feature set that your software has to offer. Why is this so important? In the graphic below, I have listed only a few of the ways that software enhancements can impact the bottom-line.

improved-bottom-line-700px

As I challenge myself to seamlessly interject concepts from other cherished feature films, this is where I say, “Help me, help you!” When it comes to your software, aspire to A.C.E. the experience.

Accountability: Appoint an Internal Software Administrator (ISA). This person would be responsible for forging a relationship with your software vendor(s). They need to be familiar with the vendor’s release cycle and understand what each new version has to offer. They would then be responsible for scheduling recurring meetings with key stakeholders to discuss their findings and recommendations. They should also volunteer to participate in any focus groups that your vendor may offer. This is a great way to ensure that your vendor understands the specific needs of your organization and how they fit into the big picture.

Collaboration:  Who are these “key stakeholders” that I mentioned above? They would be your Change Control Board (CCB). This group should be comprised of members of each functional department of your business, as changes may have ripple effects throughout the organization. Affecting change is often easier when the decision is made jointly as initial buy-in will be stronger.

Execute: Assuming the CCB finds value in certain enhancements, develop a plan to implement them. This will often involve initial training, shadowing and follow-up that could span a few weeks. Remember that each implemented change is a deviation to someone’s routine. Depending on the work flow adjustment required, a fair degree of staff coaching may be involved.

In fairness, I realize that I’m making all of this sound really easy. It’s work and it requires commitment. Alas, if it means that you can add to your bottom-line, become more efficient or play a round of catch with “Shoeless” Joe Jackson, it is worth exploring.

Now go A.C.E. your experience!

You Say You Want a Revolution…

Ryan Newsome

Ryan Newsome

Vice President of Software Engineering at SRS Health
Prior to joining SRS almost 10 years ago, Ryan started his career as a software engineer for Map Info/Pitney Bowes. Throughout the years Ryan has been an expert in all things web, interoperability, and in agile leadership. He currently oversees all of product engineering at SRS and has led SRS’ transition to an Agile/Scrum Development Methodology. In his free time, you can find Ryan either skiing, cycling or spending time with his family. Fun Fact: Ryan played Division 1 Soccer at Sienna where he attended on a scholarship. Goal!
Ryan Newsome

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This past February, SRS Health sponsored its third annual hackathon. Hackathons are the proving grounds for new ideas. These events stimulate creativity and encourage risk-taking to develop innovative solutions to new or persistent problems.Hackathon Blog ImageThis year’s hackathon was organized around the theme of Data Revolution, and when you think about it, there’s a revolutionary quality to the very idea of hackathons. The word “hackathon” is a portmanteau of the words “hack” and “marathon,” where “hack” is used in the sense of exploratory programming. It’s this exploratory aspect of hackathons that enables participants to be super creative, push boundaries, think outside-of-the-box and develop revolutionary ideas. We solicit ideas from customers and SRSers that can range from practical enhancements to futuristic solutions for tomorrow’s problems.

At SRS Health, we’ve noticed some strong benefits to running hackathons:

  • Feedback – If our product is going to help solve your problems, we need to know what those problems are. Hackathons allow us to discover problems and explore solutions.
  • Engagement – Hackathons build team and community spirit. Participants have fun, and they get a chance to collaborate with others with whom they don’t typically work with on a daily basis.
  • Diversity – Having a wide range of participants generates a variety of fresh perspectives, both on existing problems and for future possibilities.

The result? An event filled with fun, high-energy, free food, great ideas, engaging presentations and amazingly talented people. There are a number of concepts that we are very excited about and could make its way into future editions of our products.

So, if you have a revolutionary idea that you’d like to see become part of our product—or even just an evolutionary step that fixes a chronic problem—let us know about it. It may be the perfect candidate for our next hackathon. The truth is, we all want to change the world of healthcare, and we’d love to explore and define that future together with you!

 

 

 

The Importance of Flexible Technology in High-Performance Practices

Adam Curran

Adam Curran

Product Marketing Manager at SRS Health
Adam Curran is a Product Marketing Manager at SRS. He oversees marketing intelligence to support the development of strategic marketing plans. Prior to joining the organization, he was a key member of a pharmaceutical software company’s Clinical Development Business Unit, specializing in the clinical data management elements of the drug development lifecycle. He was also the editor for their microsite’s blog. Adam has also held roles at the UK’s National Energy Foundation and Skills Funding Agency.
Adam Curran

flexible-tech-blogAn article posted recently to LinkedIn—about the jobs most and least likely to fall victim to robot replacements—started me thinking about the place of technology in healthcare. One takeaway from the article is that automation is best deployed for tasks that are manually or cognitively repetitive, freeing humans to specialize in tasks that are non-repetitive and non-predictable, ones the writer describes as requiring “human intuition, reasoning, empathy and emotion.”[1]

That was exactly the promise of electronic health record (EHR) technology—routine bureaucratic tasks would be automated, freeing doctors and staff to do what they do best: treat patients. Yet in a recent study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, ambulatory physicians spent an average of a full hour at the computer for every hour they spent face to face with patients.[2] Imagine automating a factory and discovering that workers now worked twice as long, or produced half as much, because of the time required by the new technology that was supposed to reduce their workload.

Paradoxically, with recent advances in technology, it is now more possible than ever for EHRs to fulfill their original promise—and more; the problem is that most of the EHRs being offered to medical practices are simply the wrong technology. In an attempt to meet standardized government regulations, vendors have created standardized EHRs—gigantic, one-size-fits-all behemoths that attempt to meet the needs of all physicians, but end up missing the mark with nearly everyone. Particularly when it comes to specialists. KLAS’ Ambulatory Specialty 2016—One Size Does Not Fit All—Performance Report found that although traditional EHR vendors try to cover all specialties, fields like ophthalmology, orthopedics, and dermatology still lack the functionality required.[3]

This is why one size definitely does not fit all. The right EHR solution for a hospital or general practitioner, seeing a limited number of patents with a wide variety of conditions, will look quite different from the EHR for specialists who see a high volume of patents with similar complaints. And of course, different specialties won’t want exactly the same EHR, either, making flexibility—rather than universal applicability—a major prerequisite.

No wonder that 86% of specialists, according to Black Book Market Research, agree that the single biggest trend in technology replacements these days is the move to specialty-driven EHRs because of the workflow and productivity complications that accompany conventional, template-driven EHRs.[4]

Unfortunately, the problems with inflexible, template-driven EHRs don’t end with the lack of specialty-specific solutions. A secondary, but still significant, concern is the inability of many EHRs to be tailored to the need of individual physicians within the practice. One doctor may prefer taking notes, another inputs her own data, while a third dictates; one may be comfortable communicating through a patent portal, another prefers the phone. True flexibility means that no provider has to change the way that he or she has been practicing medicine simply to satisfy the demands of a generic template.

It also means that, when it comes to increasingly crucial matter of data collection, the decision about how data should be collected—what should be collected electronically and which should remain manual—is left up to the individual practice. In the next blog, I will look at what is called “role-based data entry,” and how this can increase productivity and cut costs.


 

[1] https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/5-jobs-robots-take-first-shelly-palmer

[2] http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2546704

[3] Ambulatory Specialty 2016—One Size Does Not Fit All—Performance Report. KLAS. April 2016.

[4] https://blackbookmarketresearch.newswire.com/news/specialty-driven-ehrs-make-a-comeback-reveals-2016-black-book-11534546

A New Data Has Dawned

Scott Ciccarelli

Scott Ciccarelli

CEO at SRS Health
Scott Ciccarelli, Chief Executive Officer at SRS, has more than 20 years of diverse management and operations experience garnered as a senior executive at GE, where he headed two of the company’s businesses—most recently, GE Healthcare’s Services, Ambulatory and Revenue Cycle Solutions. His areas of expertise include business strategy, leadership development, operational rigor (Lean Six Sigma), and the delivery of enhanced value for customers through quality improvement and innovation.
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new-srs-blog-v2As we all prepare for another year of change in the healthcare industry, it is my privilege to share a big change of our own: SRSsoft is now SRS Health!

Why would we change our name, our logo, and our tagline? And what does this mean to our clients?

During our 20 years of innovation, the healthcare technology field has been radically transformed. So has SRS. What began as a document management company is now something completely different. We have reinvented SRS as a data solutions company that can help drive better care and better outcomes for our clients today…and in the future. That’s more than an evolution; it’s a revolutionary change worthy of rebranding.

Our Name                                                                                                                         Why did we add “health” to our name? The new moniker comes from our expertise at supporting your expertise: patient health and practice health. Our flexible data platform and integrated best-of-breed approach allows specialists to utilize HCIT in a way that improves the experience for their patients and their practice.

Our Logo                                                                                                                         The orb shape of the logo represents the continuum of engaging patients before, during, and after their visits. It represents the perfect balance of improved efficiency with proven outcomes.  And it represents the unending dedication of our team to remain in motion as we continue to pioneer the HCIT solutions of the future. The fiery color of our logo represents the passion and commitment of our people to ensure client satisfaction.

Our Tagline                                                                                                                             “Intelligent Data Solutions.” For specialists, these three words simply haven’t gone together in a way that provided the types of benefits that SRS Health offers. That’s because the EHR marketplace caters to generalists. Finally, these focused practices can escape the data dark ages with HCIT solutions that are predictive, connective, and exactly what the (specialist) doctor ordered.

To find out more about what’s behind the new SRS Health, I invite you to watch our new video. I think you’ll agree that it really is the dawning of a new data!

Wishing you SRS Health and happiness in the New Year,

Scott

The Year’s Innovations – Wrap-up & What’s to Come!

Khal Rai

Khal Rai

Senior Vice President, Development at SRS Health
Khal oversees the Software Engineering, Business Analysis, Quality Assurance, and Product Management teams at SRS. His 17+ years’ experience in software development and healthcare IT have resulted in a true passion for collaborating with customers, then translating their needs into innovative solutions and better service experiences. He believes that motivated employees and satisfied customers are keys to maintaining business success. He has a B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University.
Khal Rai

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2017-lightbulbsDepending on your point of view, 2016 was either a year to remember, or one to forget—just look at the nominations for word of the year. Pundits have proposed everything from “surreal” (Merriam-Webster’s) to “post-truth” (Oxford Dictionaries) to “unhinged” (NPR’s books editor Petra Mayer). Which is just to say, it was a year when conventional expectations were overthrown. And 2017 promises to be just as full of surprises.

For all the uncertainty, though, some trends seem sure to continue, at least in healthcare. The movement toward value-based payment is unlikely to reverse itself, which means that the optimum long-term strategy for medical practices remains the same as last year—cut costs by increasing efficiency, maximize patient base by identifying and standardizing successful treatment approaches, and stay limber by not getting locked into a cumbersome, inflexible software system.

Over the years, we have worked closely with our clients to learn what they needed from us, and to gain the sort of specialty-specific expertise that ensures that our solutions are designed around our clients’ workflows, rather expecting them to tailor their workflows to our design.

This past year, however, has been particularly transformative. We have made a quantum leap forward by upgrading our EHR into something far more—an intelligent, data-focused solution that responds to today’s industry challenges and lays a solid but flexible groundwork for the future. It’s a unique, best-of-breed, specialty-focused approach that gives users the power to define and collect whatever data points are relevant to their success while still maintaining their preferred clinical workflow options.

What we have achieved so far – 2016 recap

We entered last year determined to expand our physician-centric approach to include all stakeholders in the outpatient healthcare delivery system. Because we put our clients’ requirements first, we had to take a fresh look at what their needs actually were in this changing landscape. The biggest need? Tools to capture the data they wanted, but only that data, without anything unnecessary that would distract from their primary focus. (Click here to read my other post about how we do data differently.) We realized that, to meet those needs, we had to transform our offering into more than just an EHR.

We achieved this by creating a  connected software system that lets practices distribute the data-collection process over the entire treatment encounter—before, during, and after the patient visit—in whatever way is most efficient and sensible for them. Here is what we have delivered:

  • Flexible Data Platform (FDP) – Discrete data collection and reporting, free from a forced template-based environment.
  • Smart Workflows (SWF) – Guided workflow to help practices optimize their daily schedules by letting them determine who does what best, where and when.
  • Patient engagement platform – A patient-portal solution that seamlessly engages the patient pre-visit. Success is measured by higher patient compliance, lower check-in costs to practices, and greater patient engagement in their own health post-patient visit.
  • Interoperability – An Application Program Interface (API) that allows for efficient data exchange between systems, and that gives practices the flexibility to choose the best solution to any given problem (e.g., clinical, financial) without sacrificing cost and/or productivity.

What’s next? – Even more data!

We have already laid the foundation for what is required today and tomorrow. The next step is to ensure that we maximize the value of what we offer by providing the following additions to fulfill our vision:

  • Regulatory compliance – Prepare clients to understand, comply, and succeed while retaining productivity and efficiency focus (e.g., MU / MIPS, AMC, PQRS reporting).
  • Outcomes – Invest in solutions and technologies to help practices drive, improve, and document clinical outcomes to improve patient care and increase reimbursements
  • Data and AI – Continue to optimize SRS’s recently released SWF and FDP solutions to leverage data and artificial intelligence to optimize clinical workflows.

We understand that no two practices are alike—they all have different rates and style of data collection. One practice may need to automate everything immediately, while another may only automate elements that will drive down costs, and decide to keep other processes manual. Our solution is designed with this level of flexibility in mind—to satisfy each practice’s requirements for today while having the functionality to support their evolving needs in the future.

Wrapping it up

The underlying SRS strategy is a physician-centric approach we call “practical innovation.” We are more than just a solutions vendor . . . we focus on finding a solution to the specific challenges facing specialists. We partner with practices to solve their actual business problems—we help them stay independent, drive revenue growth, lower costs, stay compliant with regulations, and demonstrate clinical quality.

If you’re looking for a partner who will really listen to you and understand your needs, who will help engage your patients and produce better clinical outcomes, who will keep your practice competitive in a changing environment, then SRS is your partner of choice—for today, and for whatever unpredictable tomorrow awaits us down the road.

What Are Specialists Faced With Today? Uncertainty and Change!

Ryan Newsome

Ryan Newsome

Vice President of Software Engineering at SRS Health
Prior to joining SRS almost 10 years ago, Ryan started his career as a software engineer for Map Info/Pitney Bowes. Throughout the years Ryan has been an expert in all things web, interoperability, and in agile leadership. He currently oversees all of product engineering at SRS and has led SRS’ transition to an Agile/Scrum Development Methodology. In his free time, you can find Ryan either skiing, cycling or spending time with his family. Fun Fact: Ryan played Division 1 Soccer at Sienna where he attended on a scholarship. Goal!
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Changes AheadRecent Nobel-recipient Bob Dylan wrote “The Times They Are A-Changin’” in 1963—a time of growing social upheaval reflected in the song’s lyrics, which called for listeners to acknowledge and embrace the transformations taking place around them. As I listened to this song over the past weekend, I couldn’t help but draw a correlation to the radical transformations we are currently experiencing in our industry. The past several years have epitomized the term “change” as the nation has taken big steps to transform the delivery of healthcare.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, signed in 2009 by President Barack Obama, was one of the catalysts for this transformation by requiring the “meaningful use” of digital systems in healthcare. Since then, change has been the only constant that we have been able to count on. Government regulations, payment models, and product innovations have continued to evolve in disruptive ways—both good and bad. As soon as we become comfortable with one wave of change, another wave is already threatening to drench us to the bone (for us, the next big one is MACRA & MIPS).

So, coming off nearly a decade of constant uncertainty, what’s next? Well, you guessed it—more change! Starting in 2017 we will have new policy leaders in place who have promised to significantly restructure the incumbent’s healthcare programs. President-elect Donald Trump’s appointment of Tom Price as the head of HHS may be indicative of the changes on the horizon. Price, a 6-term congressman from the Atlanta, Georgia, area, was formerly an orthopedic surgeon. Will a specialist at the helm help make government programs, that have typically been focused on primary and in-patient care, more meaningful for specialists?

Time will tell, but the one thing that is certain is that, as the song says, the wheel is still in spin. In other words, the times they are still a-changin’.