We Must Enable Patients to Become Better Stewards of Their Own Care

Conventional wisdom says that people perform better if they have a vested interest in the outcome of a given situation. From experience, employers know this to be true: Employees who are given an ownership stake in their company historically perform better, and enjoy a higher degree of satisfaction from their respective jobs than do their non-stake-holding counterparts.

Recent research has shown that a similar premise holds true in healthcare as well. The Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS), which has expanded its focus on patient engagement each year states, “Patients want to be engaged in their healthcare decision-making process, and those who are engaged as decision-makers in their care tend to be healthier and have better outcomes.” The most commonly cited technologies hospitals plan to add involve patient-generated health data solutions (2016 HIMSS Connected Health Survey). Generally speaking, the greater the engagement of the patient, the better the results, and information technology (IT) can support improved engagement platforms, such as patient portals, secure messaging, social media and other technologies.Graph

Data underscores importance of patient engagement
According to a 2016 New England Journal of Medicine survey of 340 U.S. healthcare executives, clinician leaders and clinicians at organizations directly involved in healthcare delivery:

  • 42% of respondents indicated that less than a quarter of their patients were highly engaged.
  • More than 70% reported having less than half of their patients highly engaged.
  • And to underscore the importance of this result, 47% of those surveyed revealed that low patient engagement was the biggest challenge they faced in improving patient health outcomes.

In addition, a 2017 U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) report recommends that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) “should assess the effectiveness of its efforts to enhance patient access to and use of electronic health information.”

This is not only true for hospitals, but also for specialty care practices, such as orthopaedists, ophthalmologists, dermatologists, gastroenterologists and other high-performance specialists. In these environments, it is imperative that practices understand the very specific needs of their patients, and how to best conduct outreach that will increase patient portal access and engagement.

How has your practice encouraged more patient engagement?

Patient-Reported Data Collection and Return on Investment

ROI-300x300-screenDetermining ROI Metrics

The determination of when an investment recoups its costs is in many instances a fairly straightforward matter. In other instances however, it isn’t quite that simple. As the transition to value-based healthcare advances, providers are keenly looking for ways to assess the impact of patient-reported outcomes data on their bottom line.

The identification of a specific ROI metric to the cost of deploying a patient-reported outcomes data platform deployment is dependent on a number of factors that are not always easily quantifiable. Much depends upon what kind of data is being collected, the purposes for which it is being collected and both the qualitative and quantitative nature of the data.

To ensure a credible and reliable calculation of the ROI of patient-reported outcomes data collection, providers should rely upon a rigorous systematic approach for evaluation. One such methodology can be found in the work of the ROI Institute, through their “evaluation framework,”1 which categorizes results in a prescribed, logical order. This recommended sequence represents a chain of impact that can attribute and account for benefits realized. This framework consists of 5 levels of information to consider:

  1. Reaction to the program, particularly the perceived value of the program.
  2. The extent of learning such as skills, competencies, knowledge, and insights in the program.
  3. The extent of application and use of knowledge, skill, and insights acquired during the process.
  4. The program’s effect on the data such as, sales, productivity, quality, time, and costs.
  5. The ROI, the net monetary benefits compared to the cost of the program.

Patient-reported outcomes data collection offers its users a myriad of ways to generate value. For researchers, the data analysis tools provide powerful opportunities to analyze deep data sets. Practice managers are enabled to follow physician members to uncover best practices. And of course physicians can optimize their CMS reimbursement adjustment amounts by monitoring their performance scores throughout a performance year. The point is each user has a unique basis from which to evaluate and determine the overall benefit Patient-reported outcomes data collection contributes to a provider’s practice. Any valid assessment of an ROI must be tailored to the specifics of each user. Any generalized metric is clumsy at best and more than likely misleading.

Value Return to Physicians

The value of any patient-reported data collection platform to a physician must be measured by an array of considerations requiring objective and deliberate analysis. Each aspect of a physician’s practice that is impacted, whether directly or indirectly, necessarily needs to be factored into the equation. Failure to pursue such diligence in the assessment process will more than likely produce an incomplete and misleading result.

Application of the ROI Institute’s evolution framework offers a substantive foundation on which to assemble a meaningful appraisal. The framework is flexible enough to enable application to each unique practice configuration, yet establishes cumulative benchmarks that result in a succinct and useful metric. The sequential nature of the framework reinforces an approach that captures seemingly disparate variables and leverages them collectively to reveal a deeper and more nuanced valuation of deploying a patient-reported outcomes measurement system.

Data mining technology, such as OBERD’s “Mountain,” can factor prominently in generating value out of the data being collected. With it, physicians have the power to slice and dice information in a myriad of ways for infinite uses. For example, providers may measure effectiveness of care, by specific procedure as well as in aggregate. These insights, which can be generated on-demand, can empower physicians with invaluable and actionable information. No longer is a physician constrained to wait for an annual, boilerplate report.

The capacity to robustly leverage data enables insightful benchmarking for both patient and practice analysis can fortify operational best practices. By incorporating efficiencies and successful procedures revealed through tools such as Mountain, new competitive and productive gains can be realized.

A byproduct of this ability to mine data is to provide physicians the opportunity to license newly uncovered knowledge to manufacturers for research and development by the medical and pharmaceutical industries.

Patient Engagement

Patient portals and other technologies that identify and fortify patient touch-points provide opportunities to encourage patient participation in their own care. Heightened patient engagement can lead to better healthcare outcomes at a lower cost by increasing the efficiency of the healthcare system/care offered. In addition, the deployment of patient defined outcomes instruments offers to maximize clinician-patient communication by facilitating an environment that involves patients in their care leading to a better understanding of their conditions and quality outcomes.

Tracking patient reported outcomes for research purposes provides an exceptional marketing tool to showcase your advancement in medical treatments/surgical practices. OBERD’s powerful analytic tool, Mountain, offers providers a platform to analyze and mine the data you collect, and to benchmark against other data sets, global or local.

MIPS Compliance

The determination of any unambiguous ROI regarding MIPS compliance relies upon several factors that presently are premature to firmly assess and are simply not available. No reliable computations can be made until CMS has aggregated Composite Performance Scores (CPS) of all physicians participating in MIPS performance year one, 2017. All scores achieved during this initial year will be used to determine a “CPS Threshold” against which providers will be compared in order to assign reimbursement adjustments that will affect payment year one amounts in 2019. Until that threshold is published, it is simply impossible to identify express ROI expectations.

That said, close monitoring of CMS communications are beginning to reveal benefits through the thoughtful and strategic usage of patient-reported data measurement for the collection, analysis and reporting of patient-reported outcomes data.

CMS has published guidelines to demonstrate how reimbursement will work through the Quality Payment Program (QPP) but has yet to provide specific monetary values. The program has allocated $833 million dollars yearly for the next 5 years that will be distributed based on eligible clinician merit with a focus on quality outcomes, which is reflected in one’s CPS.  The better one’s CPS, the higher the probability that positive reimbursement adjustment will follow. Beyond the funding set aside to incentivize performance merit, here is an additional $500 million dollars available annually for the next 5 years reserved for those with an overall composite score of 70 points or above.

OBERD continues to closely monitor CMS announcements and regulatory developments. As each iteration of QPP rules are revealed, OBERD will continue to refine its products to optimize results for its customers.

Reinforcing a Practice’s Marketing Message

The publication of CMS’s Physician Compare website, by publishing clinician measure scores, allows patient to embody the role of a consumer in shopping around for the best healthcare and for providers that demonstrate higher quality outcomes. CMS has further advanced the promotion of provider score transparency by empowering qualified clinical data registries (QCDR) to supplement Physician Compare website information with enriched content that will further empower patients to see additional information about providers and their practice. OBERD, as a CMS-approved QCDR, is developing multi-modality scorecards to showcase a provider’s best qualities, identify top performers, identify best practices and establish additional practice marketing opportunities.

Summary

As the transition from a fee-for-service to a value-based care system continues to evolve and accelerate, the ability to efficiently and economically collect, analyze and communicate patient-outcomes data will be foundational to a provider’s success. Evidence-based healthcare decisions will rely on leveraging a patient’s involvement in their own healthcare. By increasing the role of a patient to communicate on their own individual situation and progress, that patient is afforded a more active role, which promotes better patient experience and satisfaction. Better performance scores directly impact reimbursement computation.

Of the ROI Institute’s five point evaluation framework mentioned earlier, it needs to be underscored that the first three elements address subjects that do not lend themselves to quantifiable measurement. The perceived value derived from acquired knowledge, skills and insights precludes the value received in the application of those newly realized observations. Application of the new knowledge in turn can directly impact and drive a provider’s best practice.

The ROI evaluation framework begins to address quantifiable activities in step four only after the first three steps of the process are accomplished. These activities, such as sales, productivity and costs can only be accurately assessed in the context of framework steps 1-3. The ROI Institute’s framework requires that all four steps are necessary, a condition precedent, before any actual ROI, the net monetary benefit compared to cost, can be accurately assembled.

OBERD understands that providers desire to be free from the routine task of data collection. Providers can now harness exceptional new methods to gather information from their patients, learn from them and to apply those insights towards that patient’s care. A healthcare provider should be able to practice medicine, and not have to monitor every single regulatory change. OBERD is set up to do just that. Be assured that OBERD will continue to advance solutions that address the latest in compensation strategies that generate optimized benefit to its customers.

As seen in OBERD’s Insights Blog.

Learn how you can take your value-based care to new levels with our new outcomes solution in partnership with OBERD.