Hackathon 2.0: Bringing the Best Out of Participating Clients and Employees!

hack2-srs-logoWe have had a lot of fun here at SRS over the last couple of weeks; don’t worry, we have still been working hard! To clarify, we have been focused on our second annual Hackathon, a collaborative forum designed to innovate meaningful HCIT solutions for specialists.

We brought together our enthusiastic employees throughout the organization as well as select clients to come up with ideas for new and useful innovations. We didn’t simply see this as a side-project; our staff was fully committed to this project, and was working around the clock over the last couple of weeks bringing these great ideas to fruition.

This year’s theme was “Problem Solved”. Cross-functional teams were created and tasked to come up with breakthrough solutions to problems that would affect the patient and/or clinical experience.

Teams were also asked to think from the point of view of a new start-up healthcare IT company and encourage to invent a solution that really responded to a need in the market today from a fresh perspective.

Each team presented their solution’s business case, along with a prototype, video, and supportive marketing campaigns. Judges selected winners, and SRS will be funding development of the innovations that they believe will have the biggest impact on providing better healthcare through technology.

Several of the ideas selected will be showcased in the Innovation Expo at SRS’ annual User Summit. Clients can see future innovations in action and add their feedback at the event. Last year’s expo was one of the highlights of the conference.

We are always looking to hear great ideas, and get very excited during the Hackathon period which allows us to bring together our creative staff and client partners. That is the thing about great ideas; you just never know where the next one will come from! This is the way to come up with solutions that are truly user-centric in design.

Click here to learn more about how we do things.

Patient-centric Data Capture—Where Is It?

hc-prof-blog-image-v2We all know how increasingly important the patient experience is becoming in clinical trials and healthcare. With more emphasis being placed on quality care and patients’ active participation in their own treatment, it follows that this will have an effect on what solutions and services are required to satisfy consumers in this market. Consumers nowadays have a flood of information available at their fingertips—an amount unimaginable even just 15 years ago. And while the ability to look up symptoms online in the middle of the night has undoubtedly increased the number of hypochondriacs, it has also led to a higher number of truly educated patients, and an accompanying need for specialists to respect and involve them in the diagnosis and treatment process.

But what does it mean to be patient-centric? Our good friend Wikipedia defines it as “support[ing] active involvement of patients and their families in the design of new care models and in decision-making about individual options for treatment.” Not much help, is it really?

The Institute of Medicine defines it as “providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values, and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions.” The difference in definitions seems to come down to how involved the patient gets in their healthcare. The first definition suggests that the specialist is at the center of decision making, but supports the patient involvement as well. The latter, at least in my opinion, implies that the specialist actively collaborates with the patient by empowering them with the necessary data to make their own treatment decisions.

By either definition, however, data capture is currently falling short of what it takes to be truly patient-centric, despite how far it has come over the last decade. Electronic Health Record (EHR) solutions have been widely adopted in a variety of healthcare specializations, and although the way they collect data can create friction and inefficiencies with specialists’ workflow, they still provide enormous benefits. They streamline access for the specialists to vast quantities of patient data more quickly than traditional paper-based systems, and they eliminate need for patients to fill out the same forms again and again at each specialist’s office.

With the power of technology growing at an exponential rate, new technology solutions are coming out every day, but the challenge is to figure out how to use these technologies to address the real problems that medical practices are facing. In other words, to provide the right technology solution, one that really works for practices. At the moment, more often than not, EHR software interferes with and takes time away from the doctor-patient interaction. However, by giving specialists data-capture tools that allow them to focus on their traditional role of caregivers and that reduce the time and energy that is diverted away from patients, everyone benefits: specialists win, and therefore so do their patients.

There are already good vendors out there who are designing solutions with specialists’ requirements in mind, and some of these certainly help to give specialists more time with patients. However, to achieve a truly patient-centric solution, data capture will need to both predict and adapt to the data being fed into it in real-time. This would give specialists relevant, up-to-date information right at their fingertips, which they could use both to inform their own decision-making process and to educate the patient on their particular condition. The result would be a collaborative, evidence-based plan of care that—because the patient had participated in creating it—would lead to an increased patient commitment to the plan and a better outcome overall.

That’s what providing a truly patient-centric solution looks like.

To find out more about the evolution of data capture and what to expect in the future, you can read our recent white paper on this topic.

How the Evolution Started in Data-Capture Technology

EvolutionDo you remember the days when cell phones were brand new? I am not referring to the Nokia 3310 (back when all we needed was a single game, Snake – simpler times . . .). I am talking about when they were first launched and introduced. Those were the days when cell phones were only purchased by business people and you could only make calls near a transmitter tower (oh how mobile!). They used to come with big cases, but these were not for the phone itself; their real purpose was to hold the phone’s huge battery! Despite that, the purpose of original cell phones was clear—to make phone calls on the move. Well, so long as you were going past at least one transmitter tower on the way . . .

Fast-forward to today—the cell phone we once knew has completely changed, and along with it, we see a transformation in how people see and use their phones. What used to be their original purpose (making phone calls) has now been virtually replaced by activities such as Internet browsing, checking social networks, shopping, listening to music, and playing games (you can still download Snake, but it’s no longer pre-installed!).

It would probably be more fitting to call them powerful mini-computers; the average smartphone today is millions of times more powerful than all of NASA’s combined computing power in 1969. Smartphones today are even powerful enough to run old Windows operating systems such as Windows 95. Good to know for all those old-operating-system enthusiasts who want a bit of nostalgia on the go.

The evolution of cell phones eventually led to a revolution in the market. The pace at which technology was developing eventually led to the creation of the first iPhone—the rest is history!

So how does the evolution and revolution in cell phones relate to data-capture technology? Just as the first cell phones had only one purpose—talking—data capture nowadays means simply sharing or collecting information. While 1990s-era electronic data capture focused almost exclusively on big data associated with clinical trials such as EDC and electronic patient reported outcomes (ePRO), it was eventually adapted for private medical practice. Over the years, the opportunities afforded by electronic data capture have grown, partly because of healthcare costs.

However, although these first digital data-capture systems offered some relief to physicians and other users, they were still time-consuming and cumbersome, creating more productivity issues than they solved. What was meant to save time actually had the opposite effect; while the new systems were being introduced, they actually resulted in physicians seeing fewer patients.

Back then, these solutions were designed for primary-care physicians. Specialists, who needed to maintain smaller sets of data, found that these first digital systems did not take their specific needs into account. What specialists required was a solution that would allow them to see many patients without sacrificing data quality and regulatory compliance. Fortunately, there were a few vendors who had the insight to rise up to the challenge and help to solve these specialty-specific problems.

To find out more about the evolution of data capture and how EHR solutions are becoming revolutionary—like smartphones—read our recent whitepaper on this topic.

What is HCIT Friction?

wheelThe Truth Is Stranger Than Friction

I just returned from two eye-opening experiences: HIMSS, the largest health IT event in the industry, and AAOS, the country’s largest orthopaedic conference. Of course, I heard about the amazing benefits of many new technological and medical breakthroughs . . . But what really got my attention was hearing some physicians say that when it comes to productivity, they wish they could return to the days of paper charts.

What? Since when do medical professionals want to turn back time on medical technology advancements like productivity solutions? All of those innovations were designed with an important goal in mind: to help doctors have more time to help more patients. However, due to many reasons, the data collection process is getting in between doctors and patients. That friction is rubbing both parties the wrong way—and the need to get beyond that friction was the clear message I took away from both HIMSS and AAOS.

Friction isn’t inherently bad: it is the force that allows our tires to grip the pavement, lets us steer the way we want to go, and enables our brakes to stop us from crashing. However, excess friction hinders movement and wastes energy: that’s what’s happening right now in the world of EHR solutions. What we need are systems that work with—not against—physicians while they perform their very important work. By creating smarter solutions, we can transform friction into traction: positive momentum that takes us where we want to go, faster—in a way that enhances, instead of interferes with, the doctor-patient experience.

In order to really help advance healthcare, the next generation of EHR solutions must do more than just capture data. They must be intelligent technologies that go beyond frictionless, creating the traction to:

  • Operate in the way that best supports each doctor’s work style, so that physicians can concentrate on patients, not iPads
  • Enable seamless data collection during patient interactions, so that doctors are not spending hours recording data later
  • Leverage mobile platforms and predictive technologies that not only keep up with busy specialists but actually help move them forward

Turning meaningless friction into meaningful traction is the driving force behind what we are calling Smart Workflows. Living and practicing in the Information Age, the only way to go is forward—not to reduce the technology involved, but to reduce its intrusiveness by developing software that easily captures required data while actually prioritizing the physician’s role in medicine. That’s something no EHR has ever done—nor any paper chart, for that matter.

To frictionless and beyond!

~ Khal Rai

Top 5 Observations at HIMSS16


With a conference that draws over 50,000 attendees, 1300+ vendors, 300 educational sessions, and interesting keynote speakers, there is always plenty of food for thought. So much so that it can take a while to really assimilate all the information and process it into key observations.

Our team has just returned from the show, so I just wanted to quickly share our top 5 observations at HIMSS16:

  1. Value-based payments: There was much discussion on the shift to value-based payment. The MACRA/MIPS regulations are expected in the spring, which could mean as early as March or as late as June, with the Final Regulations mandated to be published by November 1. While the goal of MIPS is to simplify life for providers (by rolling up all the various current programs into one streamlined program), it’s a good bet that things will get more complex before they get easier. All of this begs the question: How will physicians be ready to comply beginning on January 1, 2017?
  1. Interoperability: No surprise that everyone was talking about this! This was reinforced when big-name healthcare technology providers promised to use standardized APIs to make access to patient information easier. Interestingly enough, this also ties in with the HHS wanting to expand its oversight of electronic health record vendors. The proposal they released on March 1 would allow the agency to review how certified health IT products interact with other products, with the aim to prevent data blocking, and to review certified HIT vendors if required (and even to take away their certification if necessary!) The comment period for the ONC rule ends on May 2.
  1. Population Health: This is increasingly becoming one of the top buzzwords at this show. More and more people are talking about it, but there does not seem to be a clear definition about what value this brings. After discussions with different attendees and vendors, it was clear how unclear it was: everyone was providing different answers. The term population health is much more widely used than it was back in 2003 when it was defined by Greg Soddart and David Kindig as “the health outcomes of a group of individuals, including the distribution of such outcomes within the group.” The management element is using the aggregation of patient data to devise actions that improve both clinical and financial outcomes. But what data should be used, especially when it comes to specialty practices? Clearly this is something that needs to be defined to ensure we are getting real value from these solutions.
  1. HHS and CMS: There was an interesting session with Karen DeSalvo (National Coordinator for HIT, Asst. Secretary HHS) and Andy Slavitt (Acting Administrator, CMS) where the barriers to data sharing was discussed, and 3 commitments were announced:
    1. Consumers will be able to easily and securely access their electronic health information and send it wherever and to whomever they want.
    2. Providers will share information for patient care with other providers and will refrain from information blocking.
    3. The government will implement national interoperability standards, policies, and practices and will adopt best practices related to privacy and security.

This further reinforces the 2nd observation in this post about HHS wanting to expand its oversight of electronic health record vendors. This session also brought up an interesting point about data blocking; DeSalvo pointed out that a year ago there were a “host of organizations who denied that blocking even was happening,” and now these same groups are “willing to publicly say that they want to engage in something now they’ve acknowledged info blocking can exist.” Hopefully, these same groups will follow with their pledges. As Slavitt advised, “I strongly encourage you to recognize those that don’t [live up to their pledges]” (FierceHealthIT).

  1. EHR collides with NFL: Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning, the reigning Super Bowl Champ, gave a speech at the show thanking the health IT community. For a man who has gone through 3 potentially career-breaking, neck surgeries, I think it is fair to say he can “fully appreciate the value of information systems to keep hospitals functioning.” A physician joined Manning on stage, discussing the NFL’s EHR system and their portals, allowing players access to their medical details. Manning put it like this: “Football is a game. Revolutionizing healthcare is a mighty endeavor.” He also mentioned that leaders in any field need to evolve to match circumstances (HealthcareIT News).

Of course, HIMMS is a huge show where other topics were discussed too, such as patient engagement and RCM. The points mentioned above were only our key takeaways from it. We want to understand the latest regulations and trends, and how these will impact healthcare specialists. What were your key takeaways?