EMR References: Cast a Wider Net

Client references and site visits can be a rich source of valuable information when you’re shopping for an EMR—but only if approached critically and after conducting your own due diligence. The graph below illustrates the limitations of relying on vendor-supplied client references to make an informed EMR purchase decision.

Impact of EMR on Physician Productivity

This graph represents the effect of EMR adoption on physician productivity, given the acknowledged 50–80% failure rate of traditional EMRs—specialists being on the higher end of the range. Immediately upon adoption, physicians experience a significant reduction in the number of patients they can see, and over time, they hope to regain their productivity. Some are able to achieve their pre-EMR levels, and a small number see an increase above that level—the latter are the physicians in the orange-shaded section. These are the physicians whom vendors will identify as references and whose practices will be offered for site visits.

Every vendor will have a few good references and can take potential customers to visit a “show site” client, but this is not necessarily representative of the experience of the majority of users—the experience that you can likely expect.

If this graph instead portrayed the results of a clinical trial for a new drug, would a physician prescribe this medication based on the fact that 100 (of the 1,000) patients in the study showed positive effects? Clearly not!

Ask the vendor for—and insist on—at least 10 to 15 references of practices in your specialty and at least a few that are close in size to yours. If a vendor cannot provide this, there is reason to question whether its EMR is right for your practice. Call a physician of your choosing in the reference practice(s)—selecting at random from the group’s website is most likely to yield an objective evaluation. Don’t be fooled by one reference, one hand-picked physician, or one “show site” visit.