Just What the Doctor Ordered

The government is hearing the voice of the specialists.

Since the inception of the EHR incentive program in February 2009, specialists have been concerned about their role in a program that is clearly focused on primary care. As I have pointed out before, the legislation’s primary-care focus is borne out by the composition of the decision-making committees, the allocation of funding for associated programs, and the fact that specialists were not even a topic of conversation in the deliberations until late in the game.

I have tried to advocate for the physicians—specialists, in particular—by representing their special issues via the Voice of the Physician Petition, blog postings, letters to Dr. Blumenthal and Secretary Sebelius, and by sending staff to Washington to speak on their behalf. In the last few months, specialists, their medical societies, and industry pundits such as David Kibbe and Vince Kuraitis have speculated that many specialists will not participate in the program.

Apparently, the government is worried and is taking steps to reach out to specialists to assuage their concerns. Last week, David Blumenthal confirmed publicly that specialists will not be expected to add primary-care clinical workflows to their practices to satisfactorily demonstrate meaningful use, and that they can exclude select measures that don’t apply to their practices. (See my HIStalk Practice post for more information.) While nothing in the regulations has changed since the release of the final rule in July, Dr. Blumenthal’s recent statements should dispel physicians’ initial skepticism about the potential exclusions—skepticism that had roots in disappointing PQRI experiences.

Having heard Dr. Blumenthal speak before an audience of ophthalmologists at the recent AAO meeting, I find it refreshing to see a move to a more inclusive program.