HIEs and Information Sharing: Physicians Feel the Pressure

The exchange of clinical data is one of the three pillars of the EHR incentives program, and the legislation was intended to serve as a stimulus (pun intended!) for the creation of health information exchanges (HIEs) by including significant funding earmarked for their establishment. The stage 1 meaningful use requirements provide further support by requiring physicians to take a first step towards information sharing. EHR adoption was expected to be the impetus for the development and flourishing of HIEs.

HIE and Information Sharing - Physicians Feel the Pressure

It appears that it may be just the opposite—interest in HIEs may be driving adoption of EHRs, rather than the other way around. Growth in the HIE arena is coming from private HIEs—those sponsored by health care systems to connect their own providers and facilitate the effective sharing of clinical information about their mutual patients. The growth in private HIEs is far outstripping the growth in community HIEs, according to KLAS, and physicians are facing new and stepped-up pressures to participate.

It is no longer just the carrot of the meaningful use incentives at play. The following are just two examples that have recently been brought to my attention where sticks are being used to “encourage” physician participation in information sharing. The University Physicians Network (UPN) at NYU is making participation in its information-sharing network a requirement for membership in the UPN, without which physicians do not have access to the group’s favorably negotiated reimbursement rates. A similar physician group in Massachusetts is making membership in its network a prerequisite for patient referrals.

I’m interested in hearing from readers about the development of HIEs and other information-sharing networks in your markets, and the carrots and/or sticks associated with participation.